Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire

This is the story of Louis, as told in his own words, of his journey through mortal and immortal life. Louis recounts how he became a vampire at the hands of the radiant and sinister Lestat and how he became indoctrinated, unwillingly, into the vampire way of life. His story ebbs and flows through the streets of New Orleans, defining crucial moments such as his discovery o...

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Title:Interview with the Vampire
Author:Anne Rice
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Interview with the Vampire Reviews

  • C.

    You begin.

    It seems like it might be fun.

    A little bit trashy, but fun.

    Not so well written.

    Disappointing.

    Already, you know it won't be up to much.

    You keep reading.

    Why this way?

    You read, wondering why.

    It seems pointless.

    You are bored, your mind wanders.

    You keep reading.

    You cannot stop.

    It is dark.

    So dark.

    The atmosphere.

    Dark. Macabre. Gothic. Haunting.

    Erotic.

    You are trapped.

    Trapped in someone's twisted fantasy.

    Kinky.

    Until pain and suffering and anguish and loneliness are beautiful.

    Alluring.

    Seduct

    You begin.

    It seems like it might be fun.

    A little bit trashy, but fun.

    Not so well written.

    Disappointing.

    Already, you know it won't be up to much.

    You keep reading.

    Why this way?

    You read, wondering why.

    It seems pointless.

    You are bored, your mind wanders.

    You keep reading.

    You cannot stop.

    It is dark.

    So dark.

    The atmosphere.

    Dark. Macabre. Gothic. Haunting.

    Erotic.

    You are trapped.

    Trapped in someone's twisted fantasy.

    Kinky.

    Until pain and suffering and anguish and loneliness are beautiful.

    Alluring.

    Seductive.

    But you know that they are not, and no book will make it so.

    You keep reading.

    You are bored. You put the book down.

    But you have to finish it.

    You keep reading.

    You read.

    Waiting for gratification.

    Waiting for something to happen.

    Waiting.

    You cannot look away.

    You keep reading.

    It is a beautiful day outside.

    You keep reading.

    So dark.

    So sensual.

    So strange.

    The plot shifts.

    A small climax.

    You groan.

    Sigh.

    Still a hundred and fifty pages left.

    You keep reading.

    Repelled.

    Attracted.

    You shift positions.

    You ache for more.

    You keep reading.

    ...

    Blam! Kazam! Ka-POW!

    Climax!

    Death! Destruction! Fire!

    Alone.

    Downwards spiral.

    Depression.

    Dark.

    So dark.

    There is no suicide.

    Wandering.

    Searching.

    Existential angst.

    Oh.

    That was all.

    What a stupid ending.

  • Ana

    It's probably more a 3 1/2 star book, but I'm going to go for four stars because of the amazing characters.

    Twilight jokes aside, I really enjoyed reading this novel.

    Make room on your book bucket lists because Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire is a must read. One of my casual resolutions this year was to catch up on some of the books I've been meaning to read for a while, but just never got around to. I'm so glad I fi

    It's probably more a 3 1/2 star book, but I'm going to go for four stars because of the amazing characters.

    Twilight jokes aside, I really enjoyed reading this novel.

    Make room on your book bucket lists because Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire is a must read. One of my casual resolutions this year was to catch up on some of the books I've been meaning to read for a while, but just never got around to. I'm so glad I finally picked up this book. I saw the movie first but still had goosebumps at the end.

    The bromance of Lestat and Louis.

    I know this is going to sound a little juvenile, but I ship them.

    Their relationship is so messed up and so complex. I truly believe that they loved each other the best they could under the circumstances.

    Claudia.

    She may be cute, but she is certainly a little psycho.

    Maybe my love for vampires isn't dead after all.

    P.S. I finished the book, Patty! I can finally log into goodreads with my head held high.

  • Ren

    I first read this book in High School and my sad gothic self immediately fell in love with its beautiful, damaged characters. For years this book haunted me. The rest of the Vampires books were pulpy fun but this book really had something. She captured something here and her almost baroque prose really carries the story.

    Later in life, I came to realize that Interview is a kind of

    for goths. Louis is turned into a vampire and continues his search for the answers: who he is, wh

    I first read this book in High School and my sad gothic self immediately fell in love with its beautiful, damaged characters. For years this book haunted me. The rest of the Vampires books were pulpy fun but this book really had something. She captured something here and her almost baroque prose really carries the story.

    Later in life, I came to realize that Interview is a kind of

    for goths. Louis is turned into a vampire and continues his search for the answers: who he is, why he is, what his place is. He wars with lovers, family and friends in his search to define his own life only to discover that nothing he does matters and that everyone is just as lost as he is, an ultimately there are no answers but the ones we make ourselves.

  • Kat Kennedy

    If you would kindly look at my shelves, you might notice that I've read a good chunk of vampire novels written in the past two decades. It seemed strange to me, though, that I still hadn't read one of the more important ones.

    Now, I don't think it's because this book is particularly brilliant or a masterpiece. Yet it does represent an important paradigm shift in the representation of vampires in modern literature. Whilst Vampires are still unaccountably evil in this novel, they are also relatabl

    If you would kindly look at my shelves, you might notice that I've read a good chunk of vampire novels written in the past two decades. It seemed strange to me, though, that I still hadn't read one of the more important ones.

    Now, I don't think it's because this book is particularly brilliant or a masterpiece. Yet it does represent an important paradigm shift in the representation of vampires in modern literature. Whilst Vampires are still unaccountably evil in this novel, they are also relatable, capable of sparking our empathy and intimate to us on a level not really seen previously to this novel.

    Published in 1976, it is the story of the world's most boring vampire, Louis. Okay, I take that back, ALMOST the world's most boring vampire...

    We've come a long way from the original publication of Interview With a Vampire. Previous to this novel, a story about Vampires was generally a horror novel and nobody expected Vampires to turn out to be the good guys. Now they are almost guaranteed to be, at the most, misunderstood.

    Like our current generation of teenagers...

    As far as I can see in my research, this seems to be the place where Vampire Empathizing began or at least was made popular. I wanted to know if The Lost Boys, Blade, Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Anita Blake, Vampire Diaries, Twilight et al owe their existence to Interview With A Vampire and if they've done it justice.

    Well, I've been searching for a Vampire novel or movie that is as much of a pop culture icon, that displays tenets of Vampire Empathizing and which predates Interview With a Vampire but so far my search hasn't revealed much.

    As for how this novels stands up to the wealth of vampire media that followed it? Well, in some aspects I think it is a vast improvement. The idea of Vampires being the dark seducer isn't new and using them to represent repressed sexuality has become stock standard.

    However this book deals with those two themes in a very different way. The dark seducer, Lestat, and the repressed sexual being, Claudia, both destroy Louis in vastly different ways and it's a nice, depressing change from the usual state of affairs.

    But still, on its own, it's not a fantastic book. It may have popularized Vampire Empathizing, but it's probably also responsible for a lot of terrible gothic poetry.

    And in case you're wondering if the movie is better than the book? In this instance, yes. Though I can't say why...

    I'm not sure what the movie has that the book doesn't...

    Or what makes the movie more intriguing...

    But it sure is SOMETHING!

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I have to say I liked the movie better. I mean eye candy!

    I have wanted to read this series forever and since one of my groups is doing a challenge for a badge I thought now would be perfect. BUT, if they don't get better I'm not going to waste my time.

    Too many books to waste time any more 😊

    Happy Reading!

    Mel ❤

    I have to say I liked the movie better. I mean eye candy!

    I have wanted to read this series forever and since one of my groups is doing a challenge for a badge I thought now would be perfect. BUT, if they don't get better I'm not going to waste my time.

    Too many books to waste time any more 😊

    Happy Reading!

    Mel ❤️

  • Madeline

    Damn you straight to hell, 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, for what you made me do. You made me read a goddamn vampire book. Not only that, you made me read a vampire book with a cover made entirely of shiny ostentatious material that shouted to everyone in the library as I checked this out, "Look everyone! Madeline is reading a book about vampires! SHINY SHINY SHINY LOOK AT ME! I CONTAIN SEXY BROODING VAMPIRES AND I AM SO EFFING SHINY."

    (I cannot stress how shiny-gold this cover is. Li

    Damn you straight to hell, 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, for what you made me do. You made me read a goddamn vampire book. Not only that, you made me read a vampire book with a cover made entirely of shiny ostentatious material that shouted to everyone in the library as I checked this out, "Look everyone! Madeline is reading a book about vampires! SHINY SHINY SHINY LOOK AT ME! I CONTAIN SEXY BROODING VAMPIRES AND I AM SO EFFING SHINY."

    (I cannot stress how shiny-gold this cover is. Like, the ancient Egyptians would look at this cover and say, "That's a bit much." It was awful.)

    Okay, so the book itself isn't

    , really - hence my rating of two stars, which Goodreads classifies as "it was ok." That's what the book is: just okay. Maybe I would have been more thrilled by the story if I hadn't seen the movie - even though there's stuff in the book that didn't make it into the movie, none of it is particularly thrilling. At least the movie made the wise decision to keep the blatant, in-your-face-but-unacknowledged homoeroticism (seriously, this book is, and I mean this in the most literal way possible, the gayest thing I've ever read) but changed the fact that a) Claudia is only five years old in the book and b) she and Louis do everything except actually have sex with each other. They're always kissing and caressing each other and Louis is calling her his lover and his paramour and it is

    .

    But, lest we forget, vampire books are

    to be creepy. In these post-

    days, it's easy to forget that there was once a time where vampires fucked and killed and were a general amoral all-around good time, and if one of them chose to be all broody and sad about being a vampire he was the weird one that no one else wanted to hang out with. God, I miss those days - to the point where I considered giving this an extra star, just because I was so grateful to read a story about vampires who do actual vampire stuff and it's sexy and scary instead of boring and schmoopy.

    Also good was how in-depth Rice goes into the psychology of vampires, and I loved her explanation for why they haven't overrun the planet: most vampires are miserable, and end up killing themselves. Explains Armand, who I will continue to picture as Antonio Banderas and you can't stop me:

    "How many vampires do you think have the stamina for immortality? They have the most dismal notions of immortality to begin with. For in becoming immortal they want all the forms of their life to be fixed as they are and incorruptible...When, in fact, all things change except the vampire himself; everything except the vampire is subject to constant corruption and distortion. Soon, with an inflexible mind, and often even with the most flexible mind, this immortality becomes a penitential sentence in a madhouse of figures and forms that are hopelessly unintelligible and without value. One evening a vampire rises and realizes what he has feared perhaps for decades, that he simply wants no more of life at any cost."

    That part was pretty cool. But as for the rest, I'll just watch the movie, thanks. Or not, because if we're going to be honest I don't even like the movie that much. It's probably time to admit to myself that I have no interest in reading about/watching any vampires not created by Joss Whedon. Sorry, Ms. Rice, but if my vampires must be broody, I at least want them to be funny and charming too. (or Alexander Skarsgard, because

    )

  • Mark

    One of the rare few books I couldn't finish. I could not empathize with the lead character at all - once he turned into a vampire I would be regularly bombarded with paragraphs describing how goddamn beautiful everything was now that he could see them with his vampire eyes. The forest was beautiful, the night sky was beautiful, the homeless people were beautiful...not normally, mind you, only when seen through vampire eyes.

    These special vampire eyes might be the reason why Louis (narrator) and L

    One of the rare few books I couldn't finish. I could not empathize with the lead character at all - once he turned into a vampire I would be regularly bombarded with paragraphs describing how goddamn beautiful everything was now that he could see them with his vampire eyes. The forest was beautiful, the night sky was beautiful, the homeless people were beautiful...not normally, mind you, only when seen through vampire eyes.

    These special vampire eyes might be the reason why Louis (narrator) and Lestat (sort of bad guy) spend most of their time making moon eyes at one another.

    In fact, that's mostly all I can remember from the story since the plot was so forgettable. Aside from the characters adopting a girl (which was entertaining), Louis spends most of his time admiring things or arguing with Lestat.

    Skip the book, watch the movie.

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