Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories

Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories

Four self-contained magical crimes, ripped from the streets of supernatural London. From the million-selling Rivers of London novel and graphic novel series by writer Ben Aaronovitch comes this unmissable next chapter in the saga, as PC Peter Grant faces his gruelling Detective exam, forcing him to relive the strangest cases of his career! From foling an aspiring god to co...

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Title:Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories
Author:Ben Aaronovitch
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories Reviews

  • Margaret

    The most recent offering in the Rivers of London graphic novels series.

    This one is four separate stories linked by the device of Peter Grant doing his final interview to ascertain whether he is suitable to be promoted to Detective Constable. The interviewer, Detective Inspector Chopra, has a little bit of trouble with the magical aspects of Peter's job:

    Chopra: I thought they were...

    Peter: Exaggerating?

    Chopra: Taking the piss.

    We get to learn some interesting snippets from Peter's past, get to see

    The most recent offering in the Rivers of London graphic novels series.

    This one is four separate stories linked by the device of Peter Grant doing his final interview to ascertain whether he is suitable to be promoted to Detective Constable. The interviewer, Detective Inspector Chopra, has a little bit of trouble with the magical aspects of Peter's job:

    Chopra: I thought they were...

    Peter: Exaggerating?

    Chopra: Taking the piss.

    We get to learn some interesting snippets from Peter's past, get to see Lesley BEFORE she lost her face, and see Jaget Kumar, Kimberley Reynolds, Abigail Kamara, and Frank Caffey drawn for the first time. It's interesting to me that they pretty much look like I had imagined them.

    I am now eagerly awaiting the compendium version of the latest in the graphic novels series "Cry Fox".

    The Rivers of London series just keeps getting better and better.

  • Roy

    Love this series bur this has to be the strongest offering from the graphic novels do far. Multiple short detective stories from Peters past. Told from Peters view explaining how things got solved etc. Just way too short!!

  • Mark

    Nice little filler till the next novel comes out.

  • Andrew

    Okay I will apologise in that this is a little bit late but I think the cold I have just shifted had something to say about that.

    Okay so what to say about the next in the Rivers of London graphic novel series? Well for starters as the series of books increases there is finally an nice and simply reading sequence which shows where the various novels and graphics fit in with each other and to be honest as simply as it appears its a great help especially when I am encouraging my friends (those I ha

    Okay I will apologise in that this is a little bit late but I think the cold I have just shifted had something to say about that.

    Okay so what to say about the next in the Rivers of London graphic novel series? Well for starters as the series of books increases there is finally an nice and simply reading sequence which shows where the various novels and graphics fit in with each other and to be honest as simply as it appears its a great help especially when I am encouraging my friends (those I have yet to scare off that is) in to reading this series and not getting them overwhelmed with the books.

    This book however is not as strong I think at least as the others - I think really though it maybe a plan by the writers.

    Let me explain - the series of graphic novels so far have been stand alone stories which have been contained and completed within that edition. This book however rather is a series of shorter stories which apart from a few threads have very little in common. So you would think that a slim book which has its pages subdivided even further is not good thing.

    Sort of- however what you quickly realise is that Peter Grant is going through the final stages of his DCI review - nothing new here its been brewing for a while and is in the write up to the book. So in fact rather than a cheap (or at least page filling) series of complications you have in fact the stories that go to form his review and suddenly you have a glimpse in to the progression and evolution of Peter Grant.

    Now when you stop and think about it - rather than a raging rampaging storyline you have a clever and in some cases subtle back filling story giving extra depth and character - something that action or at least fast paced book sometimes over look.

    This for me therefore is more proof that for all the chaos and magic there are still some very clever and subtle storylines still be had and I can see there are plenty stories to be told. Which I for one am very pleased to see and cannot wait to get stuck in to.

  • Wing Kee

    I found these quite technical and fun.

    World: Standard art. But the world building here is good. It's not huge and grand but it fills in the gaps nicely and also gives little character moments that make me smile. The bulk of the story is actual world building with a large chunk in actual police work which I very much enjoyed.

    Story: Small little single issue tales that tie together for Peter's exam. These little tales are paced well and offer insight on the MET and also gives little character mo

    I found these quite technical and fun.

    World: Standard art. But the world building here is good. It's not huge and grand but it fills in the gaps nicely and also gives little character moments that make me smile. The bulk of the story is actual world building with a large chunk in actual police work which I very much enjoyed.

    Story: Small little single issue tales that tie together for Peter's exam. These little tales are paced well and offer insight on the MET and also gives little character moments like why Leslie is so important and Peter's feelings towards her. It's good.

    Characters: Not the main focus but there are moments throughout. All little all beautifully written and full of the personal voice that this series is known for.

    Good little one shots.

    Onward to the next book!

  • Red Panda

    Another decent (but not outstanding) Rivers of London collection that should please (but not thrill) fans of the novels. This collection consists of four self-contained short stories linked together by a cute framing device.

  • Sadie Slater

    is the latest combined volume of the spin-off comics from Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London books. This one contains four short, self-contained casefics, recounted by Peter as part of the assessment process for his promotion to Detective Constable. The stories themselves are fairly slight, but they're entertaining enough and typically packed with geeky in-jokes (I was particularly delighted by the law firm "Bock, Loupe and Stag"), and also provides some inter

    is the latest combined volume of the spin-off comics from Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London books. This one contains four short, self-contained casefics, recounted by Peter as part of the assessment process for his promotion to Detective Constable. The stories themselves are fairly slight, but they're entertaining enough and typically packed with geeky in-jokes (I was particularly delighted by the law firm "Bock, Loupe and Stag"), and also provides some interesting insights into some other characters from the series.

  • Lyn

    Cool as the under side of the pillow.

    Peter Grant, our favorite apprentice wizard / police constable is being interviewed for a higher rank and so Ben Aaronovitch, the coolest under the pillow practitioner this side of nevernever, uses this setting as a vehicle to tell some shorter stories in the Rivers of London mythos and generally have some more fun while we wait for him to publish his next novel.

    And the wait is made easier by some well drawn artwork by collaborators Andrew Cartmel, Lee Sulliv

    Cool as the under side of the pillow.

    Peter Grant, our favorite apprentice wizard / police constable is being interviewed for a higher rank and so Ben Aaronovitch, the coolest under the pillow practitioner this side of nevernever, uses this setting as a vehicle to tell some shorter stories in the Rivers of London mythos and generally have some more fun while we wait for him to publish his next novel.

    And the wait is made easier by some well drawn artwork by collaborators Andrew Cartmel, Lee Sullivan, Luis Guerrero, and Mack Chater.

    As in the previous graphic novels volumes, we are also entertained with some short sketches.

    Good times.

  • Carol.

    Ben Aaronovitch is a talented writer. And a very, very slow one. I try not to complain, because at least his books are dense enough that they tolerate re-reads and re-listens. But eventually, I miss the world of the Folly and turn to the graphic novels.

    is one of the more satisfying novels to date, at least in terms of story complexity and Ben's voice. Structured around Peter's application for an advanced position as Detective Constable, he reviews four cases with Detective Cho

    Ben Aaronovitch is a talented writer. And a very, very slow one. I try not to complain, because at least his books are dense enough that they tolerate re-reads and re-listens. But eventually, I miss the world of the Folly and turn to the graphic novels.

    is one of the more satisfying novels to date, at least in terms of story complexity and Ben's voice. Structured around Peter's application for an advanced position as Detective Constable, he reviews four cases with Detective Chopra, including a couple from when he and Leslie were partners. There's one that involves a ghost and a seance that was really well done, and gave the artists a chance to play with their 50s-60s styles. Acting as intermission are a couple one-page stories (I hesitate to use that word, as they are more like 'setting, thing, action, consequence' than stories) that are less successful.

    The graphic continues the structure of setting apart Peter's sarcastic/informative inner voice with actual dialogue. There's a lot of acronyms, which is only fair, as the entire premise is one of inter-department discussion, but the additional asterisks of explanation are a bit distracting. As usual, the end pages have a cover compilation. This one also includes a brief history of the Metropolitian Police, which was interesting. But. But. But. I like actual words and all that around a story, so can't we just get a short story where Peter thinks about these things while chasing ghosts?

    Pictures to come when/if I get around to it, because I feel like people should be able to see before they commit.

    Four stars for the narrative/ plot, a weak three for the structure. In the history of the graphic novels, I'd say it's one of the top two. Call it three and a half, rounding down because it's an effing graphic instead of a book.

  • Alex Sarll

    Four short stories from Peter Grant's career in policing, with the framing device of his detective's exam (conducted by an understandably confused non-magical copper). They're all far more substantial than most single issues manage these days; granted, the opening story is a bit on the Pat Mills side (apparently high-powered suits can be a bit heartless in their quest for power - why did nobody mention this sooner?) but even that has structure, process, development. The case of the mysterious Go

    Four short stories from Peter Grant's career in policing, with the framing device of his detective's exam (conducted by an understandably confused non-magical copper). They're all far more substantial than most single issues manage these days; granted, the opening story is a bit on the Pat Mills side (apparently high-powered suits can be a bit heartless in their quest for power - why did nobody mention this sooner?) but even that has structure, process, development. The case of the mysterious Goya sketch and the Slough noir are both excellent, the latter in particular pulling off a perfect landing. And finally there's a really early one from his pre-Folly days, which you could consider as the technothriller adapted for the low-stakes British bobby.

    But in some ways the real oomph comes from the extratextual factor of the publication order - these are unseen episodes from the early life of the Folly, meaning they predate (and in places prefigure) a certain character's heel turn. And seeing the team back together in the old days has exactly the same bittersweet impact as the recent

    Christmas special. Ah, the past. Even the fictional past of fictional people.

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