Beau Death

Beau Death

Peter Diamond, British detective extraordinaire, must dig deep into Bath history to ferret out the secrets of one of its most famous (and scandalous) icons: Richard “Beau” Nash, who might be the victim of a centuries old murder.Bath, England: A wrecking crew is demolishing a row of townhouses in order to build a grocery store when they uncover a skeleton in one of the atti...

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Title:Beau Death
Author:Peter Lovesey
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Edition Language:English

Beau Death Reviews

  • Cynthia

    Richard “Beau” Nash was an 18th century dandy who had the resort town of Bath wired. He set fashions and garnered attention for himself and for his town which is why unexpected events happen when a body is found that might be his is discovered. Peter Lovesey is always an engaging tale teller and this is one of his best. It’s the most recent installment in his Detective Superintendent Peter Diamond series. Don’t be afraid to plunge in with this book, this is only the second or third I’ve read in

    Richard “Beau” Nash was an 18th century dandy who had the resort town of Bath wired. He set fashions and garnered attention for himself and for his town which is why unexpected events happen when a body is found that might be his is discovered. Peter Lovesey is always an engaging tale teller and this is one of his best. It’s the most recent installment in his Detective Superintendent Peter Diamond series. Don’t be afraid to plunge in with this book, this is only the second or third I’ve read in this series and I didn’t feel lost.

    As always in a Lovesey book the characters are as developed as the plot with Peter being his moody yet lovable self. There are Lords and Ladies and representatives of lower classes some struggling and poor, others reformed or reforming or unrepentantly criminal. Best of all Beau Death is fun to read.

    Thank you to the publishers for providing an advance reader’s copy.

  • Louise

    This book was really a great read. The combination of historical characters and modern day police procedure was right up my alley. I love reading about the city of Bath, a place I fell in love with when I visited. All of this combined with really good characters and an ending I didn’t guess until the last pages. Terrific book.

  • Susan Johnson

    This is the seventeenth book in the series but it's the first one I have read. I am really kicking myself. How did I miss this series? It's fun. First of all it's set in Bath, a delightful town in England. I loved roaming the historic streets with Peter Diamond as he investigates the discovery of a skeleton found in a building being demolished. The catch is the skeleton is dressed in authentic eighteenth century clothes. Could it be the famous Beau Nash?

    As Diamond struggles to solve the myster

    This is the seventeenth book in the series but it's the first one I have read. I am really kicking myself. How did I miss this series? It's fun. First of all it's set in Bath, a delightful town in England. I loved roaming the historic streets with Peter Diamond as he investigates the discovery of a skeleton found in a building being demolished. The catch is the skeleton is dressed in authentic eighteenth century clothes. Could it be the famous Beau Nash?

    As Diamond struggles to solve the mystery of such an old murder (and it is a murder) and tries to learn how old that skeleton actually is, a fireworks event comes to town and there is another murder. And they may be connected? How can this be?

    A really fun book with lots of interesting history thrown in and a setting in a really unique place and an interesting protagonist made for an entertaining read. I can't wait to read more.

  • Gloria Feit

    From the publisher: A wrecking crew demolishing a row of centuries-old townhouses in Bath, England uncovers a body in one of the condemned buildings’ attics. The dead man has been in the attic a long time: all that’s left is a skeleton dressed in authentic 1760s garb, and a distinctive white tricorn hat. Could the body be that of Richard “Beau” Nash, Bath’s most famous historical dandy, the 18th-century Master of Ceremonies who turned Bath into the Georgian-era fashion icon it became, only to fa

    From the publisher: A wrecking crew demolishing a row of centuries-old townhouses in Bath, England uncovers a body in one of the condemned buildings’ attics. The dead man has been in the attic a long time: all that’s left is a skeleton dressed in authentic 1760s garb, and a distinctive white tricorn hat. Could the body be that of Richard “Beau” Nash, Bath’s most famous historical dandy, the 18th-century Master of Ceremonies who turned Bath into the Georgian-era fashion icon it became, only to fall on hard times and supposedly be buried in a pauper’s grave? Thrilled by the possibility of proving the body is the Beau, Detective Peter Diamond rushes to learn all he can about the famed Beau and what became of him, but is he on a historical goose chase?

    Diamond undertakes painstaking and very impressive research into all sorts of aspects of the people and events during the time frame in question, including the underwear worn by them, and eventually to try to pinpoint who was, or was not, the victim.

    The demolition is taking place as the novel opens. An observer sees, “in the attic of the end house, now ripped open, a crumpled figure in an armchair. The dust from the demolition had coated it liberally and it was a parody of the human form held together by what appeared to be long outmoded garments.” It immediately appears that the man is “spectacularly, irreversibly, abso-bloody-lutely dead. As Diamond observes, “He’s been out of it a few years. A few hundred years, if his clothes are anything to go by.” What immediately concerns him is “why hadn’t anyone gone looking for him? A missing person must have caused some concern, even a century or more before the police were created.” A challenge to the famed detective, at the very least. As he says to a colleague, “it’s a cold case and they don’t come colder than this . . . Anyone can see it’s an ancient set of bones. It’s history, almost archaeology.” The first thing to be determined is whether or not it’s murder. When, soon after this discovery, there is another, current, murder. “Two sets of clues, two grids and two solutions. Or perhaps one grid after all, one diabolically difficult cryptic challenge.” He finds himself “dealing with two cases twenty years apart.”

    The author really makes 18th century Bath come alive, and this fascinating novel is recommended.

  • John Bohnert

    I thoroughly enjoyed this police procedural set in Bath, England.

    I've now read all seventeen (17) novels in this series.

    I'm looking forward to reading the next book when it's published.

  • Julie

    A very enjoyable read with some interesting bits of history, and a satisfying mystery or two. Populated by characters who are sure to engage. This is a wonderful series, and worth starting from the beginning, however, this volume could also be read as a standalone.

  • Maine Colonial

    I’ve read all the books in the Peter Diamond series and, while this isn’t a real standout, its a decent read in spite of some flaws.

    There are two mysteries to be solved in this book. First is to identify the old corpse found in the attic of a building being demolished. That mystery takes up about half the book, while the other half is the whodunnit plot.

    I was irritated a few times with the identification plot. Diamond’s team of detectives behave badly to each other, with John Leeman being so rud

    I’ve read all the books in the Peter Diamond series and, while this isn’t a real standout, its a decent read in spite of some flaws.

    There are two mysteries to be solved in this book. First is to identify the old corpse found in the attic of a building being demolished. That mystery takes up about half the book, while the other half is the whodunnit plot.

    I was irritated a few times with the identification plot. Diamond’s team of detectives behave badly to each other, with John Leeman being so rude to his colleagues that I’d have removed him from the team. There was never anything that advanced the plot or the characters’ development in this squabbling. It just felt like annoying padding. Unfortunately, Lovesey has never done much to develop Diamond’s team as characters. I’m willing to live with that for the sake of a good police procedural, but if he is going to have action with the secondary characters, please don’t have it be pointless conflict among them.

    The other irritation about the identification plot was how slow the detectives were on some key clues, in particular on how some evidence could be used to date the time of the murder. Yes, they got around to figuring that out, but one in particular of these things was something that anybody who has so much as watched the occasional TV crime drama would know instantly.

    Once you get to the whodunnit plot, the book is much more enjoyable. The clues are dropped judiciously and the stories the investigation reveals are interesting. The descriptions of Diamond’s involvement in the Beau Nash Society as part of the investigation are particularly vivid and lively.

    All in all, a decent police procedural once you get to the whodunnit. If you decide to read it, I can’t recommend the audiobook. The male reader uses a screechy falsetto for nearly all the female voices.

  • Susan

    The skeleton found in an abandoned house is dressed in an authentic 18th century costume that could only belong to Beau Nash, onetime social arbiter of Bath. But the autopsy shows that the body is much more recent, and had been murdered. Peter Diamond, head of the homicide squad, makes those dry bones live, figuring out who had disappeared about twenty years before, despite an odd spirit of discontent among his team. But he and his team are called away from the investigation when an event planne

    The skeleton found in an abandoned house is dressed in an authentic 18th century costume that could only belong to Beau Nash, onetime social arbiter of Bath. But the autopsy shows that the body is much more recent, and had been murdered. Peter Diamond, head of the homicide squad, makes those dry bones live, figuring out who had disappeared about twenty years before, despite an odd spirit of discontent among his team. But he and his team are called away from the investigation when an event planner is found shot. It's lucky Peter's significant other Paloma is on hand with her expertise on costumes. One of the reviews of this suggested that it's one of the best in this series, but not to me.

  • Jill Hutchinson

    This is not my favorite of the Peter Diamond books. The first half limped along as Diamond and his team are called in when a skeleton is found in a condemned building. It appears that it has been there for quite a while and is dressed in clothes from the 18th century. Who is this dead man, how did he get there, and why does his clothing pre-date the building by 150 years? Pretty slow going to say the least. The plot picks up toward the end as there are clues and connections to modern times but t

    This is not my favorite of the Peter Diamond books. The first half limped along as Diamond and his team are called in when a skeleton is found in a condemned building. It appears that it has been there for quite a while and is dressed in clothes from the 18th century. Who is this dead man, how did he get there, and why does his clothing pre-date the building by 150 years? Pretty slow going to say the least. The plot picks up toward the end as there are clues and connections to modern times but there are too many coincidences for my liking. Lovesey is an excellent writer and his Diamond series is one of my weaknesses but this one disappointed me.

  • Moirad

    Learned more than I will ever need about Beau Nash. Finding a skeleton dressed in 18th century clothes should (in my view) lead the police to look at fancy dress/re-enactors etc. rather than the leap this novel made into assuming very early on that the corpse was Beau Nash's. This erroneous view takes up about half the book's investigation. An unconvincing story.

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