The Widows of Malabar Hill

The Widows of Malabar Hill

Bombay, 1921: Perveen Mistry, the daughter of a respected Zoroastrian family, has just joined her father's law firm, becoming one of the first female lawyers in India. Armed with a legal education from Oxford, Perveen also has a tragic personal history that makes her especially devoted to championing and protecting women's rights. Mistry Law is handling the will of Mr. Oma...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Widows of Malabar Hill
Author:Sujata Massey
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Widows of Malabar Hill Reviews

  • Cathy Cole

    Having been a fan of Sujata Massey's award-winning Rei Shimura mystery series, I was thrilled to hear about this first Perveen Mistry mystery set in 1920s Bombay, India. There are two interwoven timelines in The Widows of Malabar Hill. One is present-day Bombay in 1921 which shows us Perveen working hard to become an integral part of her father's law firm. The second timeline takes us back to 1916 so we can learn what happened to Perveen to make her the woman she is five years later.

    The story it

    Having been a fan of Sujata Massey's award-winning Rei Shimura mystery series, I was thrilled to hear about this first Perveen Mistry mystery set in 1920s Bombay, India. There are two interwoven timelines in The Widows of Malabar Hill. One is present-day Bombay in 1921 which shows us Perveen working hard to become an integral part of her father's law firm. The second timeline takes us back to 1916 so we can learn what happened to Perveen to make her the woman she is five years later.

    The story itself is a version of the locked room mystery. The widows live in purdah on Sea View Street. They stay in the women's section of the house, they do not leave their home, and they do not speak to any man who is not part of the immediate household. When a man dies inside a house where few people are admitted, it's going to take knowledge of the interior workings of the place to learn the truth. As a woman, Perveen is perfect for the role of investigator. She's also perfect in another way: she's become a feminist who's passionate about the rights of women and children. She shows us how such restricted lives are led and the intricate maneuverings that must be done in order to conduct an investigation. (Some policemen are much less willing to conduct themselves according to the beliefs of those who have become a part of their investigation.)

    The mystery is a strong one because readers must acquaint themselves with this unfamiliar world in order to piece together what happened. And what can I say about the setting? Massey pulled me right into this world, and I was almost on sensory overload. The old ways versus the new. Bombay's rapid growth into a vibrant major city. The various political, religious, and social factions that chafed against each other on a daily basis. And one woman, with the support of her parents, who's strong enough to stand up for what's right.

    I can't wait to get my hands on the next book in the series!

  • Sarah

    “As the only female lawyer in Bombay, you hold a power that nobody else has,” a British government official tells Perveen Mistry in this first of a refreshingly original mystery series – and he’s right. It’s 1921, and Perveen is a solicitor in her father’s law firm. Even though she can’t appear in court, her position and gender mean she’s the only individual with the means to look into a potential instance of deception and fraud.

    A Muslim mill-owner's three widows, who live in purdah with their c

    “As the only female lawyer in Bombay, you hold a power that nobody else has,” a British government official tells Perveen Mistry in this first of a refreshingly original mystery series – and he’s right. It’s 1921, and Perveen is a solicitor in her father’s law firm. Even though she can’t appear in court, her position and gender mean she’s the only individual with the means to look into a potential instance of deception and fraud.

    A Muslim mill-owner's three widows, who live in purdah with their children in his mansion on Malabar Hill, appear to have given away their rightful dower and inheritance. Perveen suspects they didn’t realize the implications of their signature, and when she visits the three individually, it appears that she’s correct. When she discovers a body on her return visit to the Farid family, she suspects a member of the household did it – but who?

    There’s considerably more to the plot than a traditional murder mystery, though. Though only 23, Perveen has a professional, mature demeanor that helps her gain the widows’ confidence, and there’s a reason behind it: she’s been through a lot in her short life. Massey depicts her backstory in chapters set back in 1916. This allows for two stories running in parallel: who committed the crime at Malabar Hill, and what trauma did Perveen endure? While I was struck by the abrupt jump back in time initially, I came to feel that this increased the suspense.

    The setting for this story is absolutely key, and from the Mistry residence on the city’s outskirts to the prestigious Taj Mahal Hotel along the harborfront, the layout of historical Bombay is described in clear, thorough fashion (the maps at the beginning are helpful but not absolutely necessary). Perveen and her family are Parsis – descendants of immigrants from Iran – and followers of Zoroastrianism, and the novel explores the religion’s traditional and more orthodox beliefs. Bombay contains a multiplicity of cultures, classes, and languages, and I came to admire Perveen’s ability to steer a fine path through it all.

    What comes through most strongly in this entertaining work, though, is the status of women, and how much Perveen had to accomplish to get where she is.

    also makes you think about how critical the support of family and others can be for women in desperation; where would the novel's characters have been without it?

    I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.

    First reviewed at

    , based on an ARC received at BookExpo last year.

  • Lynn

    Sujata Massey was a new author for me. I enjoyed The Widows of Malabar Hill very much. The location is Bombay, India in 1921 to flashbacks to Calcutta 1916-1917. Perveen Mistry is the first female lawyer in India. She was educated in Oxford but can not represent clients in court. She works in her father law office.

    Her father is representing the estate of Omar Farid who is a wealthy Muslim mill owner. He has left three widows who are living in purdah which is total seclusion. They do not leave th

    Sujata Massey was a new author for me. I enjoyed The Widows of Malabar Hill very much. The location is Bombay, India in 1921 to flashbacks to Calcutta 1916-1917. Perveen Mistry is the first female lawyer in India. She was educated in Oxford but can not represent clients in court. She works in her father law office.

    Her father is representing the estate of Omar Farid who is a wealthy Muslim mill owner. He has left three widows who are living in purdah which is total seclusion. They do not leave their living quarters and do not speak to men.

    A male household guardian who lives apart from the widows and their children but in the same house has ask them to sign over their inheritance to a boys school charity. Perveen because she is female can meet with the widows and see if they understand what the sign over to the charity means to them in the future. It needs their agreement in legal form. Perveen is representing her father's law firm. There are surprises with the widows, tensions and eventually a murder. It is somewhat like a closed off manor house mystery. Who inside the house committed the murder and are the families in danger.

    The book was rich in local sights, sounds, foods and customs. There were surprises along the way for the reader. Perveen was a strong women's right advocate in an era that did not recognize women's rights at all. One element that I thought enriched the book too was her intelligent and loving parents who stood by her through everything. This will be one of my best reads for 2018.

  • KOMET

    A few minutes ago (it's 11:20 AM EST as I write this), I had the satisfaction of finishing reading "THE WIDOWS OF MALABAR HILL." It's centered around India's first woman lawyer, Perveen Mistry, who had received her legal training at Oxford. The time is February 1921 and she has returned to her home in Bombay, where she has a job working in her father's law firm.

    Perveen has been given the responsibility of executing the will of Omar Farid, a wealthy Muslim who owned a fabric mill and had 3 wives

    A few minutes ago (it's 11:20 AM EST as I write this), I had the satisfaction of finishing reading "THE WIDOWS OF MALABAR HILL." It's centered around India's first woman lawyer, Perveen Mistry, who had received her legal training at Oxford. The time is February 1921 and she has returned to her home in Bombay, where she has a job working in her father's law firm.

    Perveen has been given the responsibility of executing the will of Omar Farid, a wealthy Muslim who owned a fabric mill and had 3 wives. In the immediate aftermath of Farid's death, the 3 widows are living in strict purdah (a type of seclusion in which the widows never leave the women's quarters nor see and speak with any man outside of the residence) at the Farid residence on Malabar Hill. Whilst carefully reading the documents, Perveen notices that the widows have signed off their inheritance to a charity. What strikes Perveen as odd is that one of the widows' signature is a 'X', which is a clear indication that the widow who affixed the 'X' probably was unable to read the document. This leads Perveen to wonder how the 3 widows will be able to live and take care of themselves. She begins to suspect that maybe they may be taken advantage of by the legal guardian entrusted by Mr. Farid to handle their financial affairs. Perveen has the welfare and best interests of her clients, the 3 widows, in mind.

    Perveen goes on to carry out an investigation. She makes an arrangement with the widows' legal guardian, Feisal Mukri, to come to the residence to visit the widows and to speak with each of them separately. In the process of doing so, tensions are stirred in the Farid residence and a murder takes place there that makes a straightforward matter of executing a family will into something much more perilous and uncertain. There is also something out of Perveen's recent past in Calcutta that intrudes into her present life.

    "THE WIDOWS OF MALABAR HILL" is a novel whose prose resonates on every page. It has a lot of twists and turns that will engage the reader's attention throughout. Sujata Massey is a writer who not only knows how to craft and tell a richly compelling novel. She'll leave the reader wanting more. And after almost 14 years of reading Massey's work, I'm already eager to begin reading the second novel in the Perveen Mistry Series.

  • Kavita

    Perveen Mistry is a solicitor, preparing herself for the day when women would be allowed to the Bar. Working with her father, she comes across a mysterious case in which three Muslim women, widows of the same man, want to donate away their inheritance to a wakf (Islamic trust). Curious about the case and worried about the women, who lived behind the purdah and had no contact with the outside world, Perveen decides to explore the case deeply. This gets her into a lot of trouble, and embroils her

    Perveen Mistry is a solicitor, preparing herself for the day when women would be allowed to the Bar. Working with her father, she comes across a mysterious case in which three Muslim women, widows of the same man, want to donate away their inheritance to a wakf (Islamic trust). Curious about the case and worried about the women, who lived behind the purdah and had no contact with the outside world, Perveen decides to explore the case deeply. This gets her into a lot of trouble, and embroils her in murder.

    The setting is Bombay in the 1920s. The Parsis are progressive, but not as progressive as they appear. Perveen has a background, which comes out in bits and pieces throughout the book. The book deals with women's past and their limitations and hurdles, irrespective of religion or race. While the secluded Muslim women were prey for any man (including, I would say, their husband!), Perveen herself had to face immense struggles in her life. From being harassed in college by male students to being abused by her husband's family, Perveen herself understands the gender power equations quite well.

    The character of Perveen Mistry is loosely based on Cornelia Sorabji, India's first woman lawyer. She was the first Indian to study in a British university, and also holds the distinction of being the first woman to study law in Oxford University. Sorabji helped many women through her work and was an outspoken pioneer of women's rights in India and England. With such an inspiration, it is no wonder that the heroine of this book is interesting. Despite the fact that the book does not focus on an extraordinary life, it does focus on an ordinary life and the extraordinary struggles in it.

    One of the things that really made an impact on me was the way female seclusion during menstruation among Parsis was depicted. I have suffered from this custom, but I did not realise that Parsis had it too. It was interesting to read about how women would be locked up in a dirty room for an entire week and not allowed to wash themselves with water. It's ridiculous! I wonder how prevalent these menstrual taboos are today. I, for one, know they are alive and kicking in my own family. It's a horrendous custom and should be outlawed, irrespective of religion.

    I found this book to be very well-researched regarding the time frame, and well-researched regarding the small cultural distinctions that must have been more prevalent at the time in which it is set. Kudos to Massey for doing a brilliant job on both the historical fiction and the murder mystery angle, with a good splash of women's stories and struggles thrown in to make it all the more better.

  • Tammy

    This is a very well done old-fashioned historical novel and my first experience with Massey. Perveen is the only female practicing lawyer in 1921 Bombay. She is unable to argue cases in court due to the strictures of the time and instead works as a solicitor for her father’s practice. At its heart, this is a murder mystery and a good one. There is a bit of a dual timeline but it doesn’t occur every other chapter so the novel flows more smoothly than other books that have used this device.

    Pervee

    This is a very well done old-fashioned historical novel and my first experience with Massey. Perveen is the only female practicing lawyer in 1921 Bombay. She is unable to argue cases in court due to the strictures of the time and instead works as a solicitor for her father’s practice. At its heart, this is a murder mystery and a good one. There is a bit of a dual timeline but it doesn’t occur every other chapter so the novel flows more smoothly than other books that have used this device.

    Perveen’s experiences in 1916 and 1917 inform the woman that she is in 1921 and you can’t help but like her. She’s intelligent, feisty and thoughtful. Her unique status as a female lawyer allows her to represent and interact directly with three widows practicing purdah. I didn’t know much about the practice of seclusion and found this to be fascinating. Actually, I didn’t know much about Indian culture in general other than that the religious and language differences among the population are many and I came away from this book knowing more than I did. By reading this book, I attended a Parsi wedding and learned a little about food preparation. I never expected to like this book as much as I did.

  • Carol (Reading Ladies)

    3.5 stars (round up) ...

    Even though I appreciate the setting of 1920s Bombay and learning about another culture, the story develops slowly. Although it’s categorized as a mystery, the mystery is not revealed until about the 50% mark. There are many storylines and the mystery is just one of them. The main reason I persisted with this is because it is one of Modern Mrs Darcey’s top summer picks. The story picks up the pace at about 75%. It’s definitely a character driven story.

    What I liked:

    * the

    3.5 stars (round up) ...

    Even though I appreciate the setting of 1920s Bombay and learning about another culture, the story develops slowly. Although it’s categorized as a mystery, the mystery is not revealed until about the 50% mark. There are many storylines and the mystery is just one of them. The main reason I persisted with this is because it is one of Modern Mrs Darcey’s top summer picks. The story picks up the pace at about 75%. It’s definitely a character driven story.

    What I liked:

    * the historical fiction elements of a courageous Perveen paving the way for women in the legal profession

    * the good relationship between Perveen and her father

    * the way Perveen’s father supports her goals and aspirations and treats her as an equal and at the same time respects the expectations of their culture

    * Perveen as a role model of an independent, brave, and ambitious woman who is not willing to accept abuse (even one time)

    * learning about a different culture

    I would have enjoyed this more if the mystery had been introduced earlier, and the slow pace at the beginning definitely affects my rating.

    If you like character driven stories and want to include more diversity in your reading, consider reading The Widows of Malabar Hill!

    For more reviews visit my blog at readingladies.com

  • Charlsa

    I can see how many people would enjoy this series. It fell a bit flat for me. It read like a Nancy Drew mystery to me. I've upgraded my rating from two to three stars. I started thinking about it more, and I realized that because I listened to this book, I was influenced by the narrator's voice for the characters. As I said, it felt like a Nancy Drew mystery to me. I think that was due to the narrator. If I had read it, I think that the story of the widows and Perveen's own story of oppression w

    I can see how many people would enjoy this series. It fell a bit flat for me. It read like a Nancy Drew mystery to me. I've upgraded my rating from two to three stars. I started thinking about it more, and I realized that because I listened to this book, I was influenced by the narrator's voice for the characters. As I said, it felt like a Nancy Drew mystery to me. I think that was due to the narrator. If I had read it, I think that the story of the widows and Perveen's own story of oppression would have melded better. So....I would definitely read it, not listen to it.

  • Kari Ann Sweeney

    I loved the setting and time period- 1920's Bombay. The main character was a strong, smart, complicated female and the first female lawyer to boot. The mystery kept me guessing as well. Perhaps what I appreciated most was the education I received about Indian culture and laws during this time period.

    Was this a knock-my-socks off book? No. But it sure was an escape! And it would make for great conversation.

  • Cheryl

    Will refrain from rating as I abandoned mission on this one. Can see how others might find the time, setting, plot line and premise delightful (think Maise-Dobbs-Goes-to-India), but I found the writing too light and trite when there are a gazillion wonderful books waiting for me.

WISE BOOK is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 WISE BOOK - All rights reserved.