Out Among the Stars

Out Among the Stars

Marvel's epic and thrilling exploration of the Star Wars galaxy continues! COLLECTING: STAR WARS #33-37 and Annual #3...

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Title:Out Among the Stars
Author:Jason Aaron
Rating:

Out Among the Stars Reviews

  • Alejandro

    Writers: Jason Aaron & Dash Aaron

    Illustrators: Salvador Larroca & Andrea Sorrentino

    It’s not unusual en long comic book series that

    Writers: Jason Aaron & Dash Aaron

    Illustrators: Salvador Larroca & Andrea Sorrentino

    It’s not unusual en long comic book series that some time to time, between storyarcs, the creative teams take the chance to tell some stand-alone stories that they want to tell but they can’t be extended to 6 issues (the usual lenght of TPBs). Also, they can do a TPB made of stand-alone tales…

    …and this one is precisely that.

    And what better than using each issue of this TPB to spotlight a different character or characters?

    First, you’ll have an adventure with Luke and Leia, stranded in an aquatic world, while escaping from Imperial patrols!

    In the second tale, Sana Starros, a mysterious acquaintance of Han Solo, calls for assistance of another old mate, Lando Calrissian, to make one heck of scam, walking in a risky thin line between space pirates, Imperial officers and even Jabba the Hutt!

    In the third story, your favorite scoundrel, Han Solo, along with Chewie, onboard in the Millenium Falcon, are sent in a perilous mission, taking a Rebel prisoner, Grakkus the Hutt, which keeps a secret, crucial for the survival of the Rebel Alliance!

    Then, at the fourth tale, R2-D2 going solo to save the metallic butt of C-3PO, whom is prisoner on a Imperial Destroyer, which non other than Darth Vader is onboard!

    Finally, it’s the turn of the bad guys to have a spotlight and it’s with the cunning SCAR Squadron proving why they’re the most dangerous Stormtrooper special forces squad in the Empire…

    …and in the same issue, you have access to some pages of the Journals of old Ben Kenobi while dealing with Tusken Raiders.

  • Anthony

    Jason Aaron wraps up his tenor on the main Star Wars title with an arc of rotating one-shot stories that all tie together a little bit. Scar Squadron returns! Han does some smuggling! R2-D2 takes down a bunch of Stormtroppers!

    I don't mean to sound salty, because it's not a bad volume and far from the worst. And the Star Wars brand is bigger than the writer so there wasn't going to be any big send off. And hopefully the book will benefit from a new writer with some fresh ideas and stories, and on

    Jason Aaron wraps up his tenor on the main Star Wars title with an arc of rotating one-shot stories that all tie together a little bit. Scar Squadron returns! Han does some smuggling! R2-D2 takes down a bunch of Stormtroppers!

    I don't mean to sound salty, because it's not a bad volume and far from the worst. And the Star Wars brand is bigger than the writer so there wasn't going to be any big send off. And hopefully the book will benefit from a new writer with some fresh ideas and stories, and one who is already familiar with writing Star Wars (ser Kieron Gillen of Darth Vader fame)

    I think they should have kept rotating artists, rather than just stick with Larroca, because I find his art boring after a while. His stuff on Vader was good but here the character faces seemed very traced a repetitive.

  • Chris Lemmerman

    When I heard that Jason Aaron's final arc of Star Wars was all one and done stories, I was a little disappointed. He'd built up a good ongoing plot, and to see him cast it all aside felt a bit cheap.

    Then I read the volume, and it honestly reads like the best of his run. Each issue focuses on different characters and offers a different flavour of story, really getting into the heads of each of them in order to show where their minds are at at this point in the story.

    We open with Luke & Leia,

    When I heard that Jason Aaron's final arc of Star Wars was all one and done stories, I was a little disappointed. He'd built up a good ongoing plot, and to see him cast it all aside felt a bit cheap.

    Then I read the volume, and it honestly reads like the best of his run. Each issue focuses on different characters and offers a different flavour of story, really getting into the heads of each of them in order to show where their minds are at at this point in the story.

    We open with Luke & Leia, who are trapped on a random planet after a failed raid on a Stormtrooper base, before following Sana and Lando on an Ocean's Eleven-type heist story with more twists and turns than a flamenco dancing cobra. Han and Chewie then transport a Hutt across the galaxy, while R2-D2 mounts a rescue for C-3P0 (the only real link to the main story, rounding off something Aaron set up in volume 4), before SCAR Squadron take centre stage for the final issue that reminds us why all of these characters are fighting in the first place.

    It's a great collection of single stories, and each one really proves why Aaron was chosen to write this series in the first place; he really understands what makes them tick.

    The art is all by Salvador Larroca, which has its ups and downs. His characters all look like they should, but they're so heavily photo-referenced that they come off like cheap mannequins rather than characters sometimes, especially Han. Everything else is great, though, if you can get past plastic-looking main characters. His Stormtroopers are great, which is no surprise after he drew Darth Vader for 25 issues straight.

    Also collected are a short final installment of the Diaries Of Old Ben Kenobi which is kind of naff, to be honest, and doesn't use guest artist Andrea Sorrentino to his fullest at all, and the third Star Wars annual by Jason Latour and Michael Walsh. The annual is your typical Han Solo story at this point; Han did something bad in his past and now the Rebellion (specifically Princess Leia) have to deal with it, in the meantime reconfirming why Han should join them in the first place. It's a good little story, and the art is very good, especially the icier scenes set outside, but it does feel like ground we've already covered more than once already at this point.

    Jason Aaron goes out with a surprising loud bang, even if the stakes aren't that high. Only some dodgy art and not quite as compelling supplemental material drag this one back from a full five stars.

  • FanboyBen

    And with that, Jason Aaron’s storied run on Marvel’s flagship “Star Wars” title comes to an end. Volume 6 – “Out Among the Stars” collects issues #33-37, the majority of which are one-shot issues featuring individual adventures with the usual gang of heroes, as well as Sana Starros and Lando Calrissian. While these issues may not represent the pinnacle of either Aaron or artist Salvador Larroca’s talents, this final volume still stands as a decent enough farewell for Aaron, before Kieron Gillen

    And with that, Jason Aaron’s storied run on Marvel’s flagship “Star Wars” title comes to an end. Volume 6 – “Out Among the Stars” collects issues #33-37, the majority of which are one-shot issues featuring individual adventures with the usual gang of heroes, as well as Sana Starros and Lando Calrissian. While these issues may not represent the pinnacle of either Aaron or artist Salvador Larroca’s talents, this final volume still stands as a decent enough farewell for Aaron, before Kieron Gillen comes aboard next month to steer the series.

    As is usually the case with comic one-shots, the stakes for most of these issues feels low. That’s okay, though because Aaron mostly does enough fun stuff with character dynamics and dialogue exchanges – pairing Luke and Leia together in issue #33, Lando and Sana together in #34, and Han and Chewie (shocker) in #35– to make up for his stories’ lack of “importance.” He also, finally, gets around in issue #36 to resolving the long-dangling plot thread that is C-3PO’s capture by Scar Squadron, which we witnessed all the way back at the end of Volume 4, “Last Flight of the Harbinger.” Although it’s hard not to wish that we’d gotten a bit meatier of a follow-through to this story after waiting so long for it to be resolved – issue #25, which depicted C-3PO’s capture, was published all the way back in November 2016, pre-“Rogue One”s release - it’s still nice to see Aaron dot all of his i’s and cross his t’s before walking out the door.

    If there’s a major disappointment in this last Volume, and really, in the last two volumes of the series as well, it’s Salvador Larroca’s art. Like a lot of people, I really enjoyed his style on “Darth Vader,” but for some reason, his time on the main “Star Wars” title has been marred by an overreliance on photorealism and tracing, which – at least for my money – is distracting at best and at worst, downright garish. It’s hard not to wish that Aaron’s final issues on the series had been accompanied by artwork that was as strong as that of his first, second, or even third arc, but hey - you can’t have everything.

  • Lance Shadow

    Another day, another review, another on going series. This one is for the sixth volume of Jason Aaron's "Star Wars", the flagship title for Marvel's comic book canon.

    Jason Aaron started off really strong with this series.

    and

    were both solid, and

    and

    were both fantastic. However, the more recent volumes have felt like filler, and it is becoming increasingly clear that Aaron has run out of ideas.

    Another day, another review, another on going series. This one is for the sixth volume of Jason Aaron's "Star Wars", the flagship title for Marvel's comic book canon.

    Jason Aaron started off really strong with this series.

    and

    were both solid, and

    and

    were both fantastic. However, the more recent volumes have felt like filler, and it is becoming increasingly clear that Aaron has run out of ideas.

    was the textbook definition of bland, and sucked all the more for it. It was just a generic story that didnt advance the overall plot.

    litterally took an entry from Ben kenobis journal and stretched it into an entire story arc of fuller. It had a cool Yoda story, but the stuff intended to connect with the larger story was lacking.

    was a great shot in the arm, but once Kieron Gillen stepped back again, we got yet more evidence that this comic is just being dragged along by the chains of demand that are asking it to continue for the sake of being a massive epic.

    I'm reviewing this comic differently because Out Among the Stars is actually a compilation of several different stories: rather than having this volume be One multi-issue story arc, this one opts instead to have a different story each issue. And too this comic's credit, most of the stories are actually pretty good.

    REBELS IN THE WILD: 3 Stars

    Issue 33 has Luke and Leia stranded on an island planet similar to Ach-To in the sequel trilogy. After outrunning the empire, they are stranded on a deserted island and must survive. They hunt sea creatures, use the ship's parts to build vaporators, and befriend a group of aliens that look like the creature played by Doug Jones in Guillermo Del Toro's The Shape of Water, fight some shore troopers (nice touch), then escape. Nothing really bad in it, but nothing that really stands out as great either. Cool new location, good artwork, Luke and Leia are in character, the new aliens are cool, the ending is sweet. There's narration, but it's not too intrusive. overall, meh.

    THE THIRTEEN CRATES: 4 stars

    The next story is about Sana Starros on a smuggling mission to gain a bunch of credits. She teams up with Lando Calrissian as they have to sweet-talk their way through imperials and some pirates. While I don't think Lando was that interesting and he could have just as easily been swapped out with another character, I found this to be a great character spotlight for Sana Starros. We get a hint about her past, but most importantly we learn what makes her tick: why does she do what she does? And the answer to that question makes her more likeable and easier to root for going forward. I like how creatively the Empire was worked into this story, and I liked the design of the pirates. The subtle connection to Rebels was pretty nice, even if it was to one of the least liked episodes of the show.

    THE HUTT RUN: 4.5 Stars

    This was probably the best of the individual stories. Han and Chewbacca are asked to transport Grakkus the Hutt to a prison on Akiva, meant to replace Sunspot Prison (lost in Rebel Jail). Honestly, if I say any more, it would ruin the clever little surprises sprinkled throughout. Han is alot of fun here, and so is Chewie. Grakkus is devious and feels threatening. Ever since his first appearance in Showdown on the Smuggler's Moon, I have always enjoyed seeing more of him. The dialogue is great, the artwork is great. The only knock I have against it is that the narration can get annoying. but it's not overly excessive and there's plenty of instances where its left to the dialogue and images to tell the story.

    REVENGE OF THE ASTROMECH: 1.5 stars

    FINALLY we get to see this dumbass plot thread resolved. After the idiotic choice to have C-3PO get captured, R2D2 finally gets the chance to rescue him in this story. It's really stupid, but it had to happen eventually. The imperials are so incompetent here that it's laughable, and I often rolled my eyes reading this. Even Vader looks a bit lame in this one. The only reason I don't give it a lower rating is because it wasn't as much the fault of this story as it was the fault of the godawful Last Flight of the Harbinger introducing this thread, forcing this setup to happen. Thank goodness this whole 3PO getting captured nonsense is finally over.

    IMPERIAL PRIDE: 3.5 stars

    This story follows Scar Squadron on a mission as they pull off another strike against Rebel Scum. This is a chance for Scar Squadron's redemption: both from the perspective of Vader in-universe, and from my perspective as a person reading this: Jason Aaron really screwed up with these guys in Last Flight of the Harbinger. Thankfully, this was a step in the right direction. While I'm not convinced that they are the baddest of the bad threat that they were built up to be quite yet, I have my faith restored after a fun story watching as they kicked some butt. The story did convince me that they did have an impact, and there was also some nice character growth for Sergeant Kreel. Not amazing, but I definitely approve.

    THE SAND WILL PROVIDE: 4 Stars

    This is another entry from Ben kenobi’s journal. Like the rest of these entries, this one was great too. Unlike the others where obi wan was closer to his revenge of the sith age, here obi wan is older and looks more like Alec Guinness. The story follows a young tusken as he is separated from his tribe after some human farms raid his village.

    By showing obi wan helping a creature that most consider a monster that should be killed on the spot, it makes obi wan so likeable. And even though the humans seem vicious for slaughtering the tusken village, they have understandable reasons. This story does a great job highlighting the struggle that is life on Tatooine, and no one is spared. The artwork, writing, and characterization were all solid in this powerful story.

    ANNUAL #3: 3 stars

    The third annual for the flagship star wars series isn't bad, but it's not as good as the previous two that we have gotten. The story follows Han and Leia as they try to find a new staging ground for the rebel alliance, following Scar Squadron's actions on Horox III. They come across some challenges, and some choices that Han made in his past come back to haunt him.

    The characters are fine whether they are old or new, but I found the story to be a bit boring. It's just a mix of what I felt were repeated elements from the group's first encounter with Sana Starros mixed with the Rebels in the Wild Story from this TPB. The artwork was also not my favorite. That's all I can say about it, it's just meh.

    THE CONCLUSION: Despite having some pretty darn good entries on their own, Out Among the Stars was just ok. It's far from the worst trade paperback I have read so far, but it feels like it's the most uninspired. After seeing how little direction the flagship series has had for 3 volumes now, it's most evident with this one in that there isn't even a story that it goes with all the way through. Screaming Citadel may have been what feels like a rare bright spot right now, but I'm solidly thinking now that that was due to Kieron Gillen: he had the idea, and Jason Aaron was able to do an awesome job going along with it.

    Anyways, I've changed my opinion on Gillen taking over after this volume. Let's see what he can do with

    . He has shown he can do a good job with the classic characters both in Vader Down and Screaming Citadel.

    Despite this, I feel bad that Jason Aaron had to be replaced. I feel like that if he has or is given a good idea, he has the writing talent both with dialogue and characterization to pull it off beautifully. Whether he chose to step down or he was booted from the project, hopefully he moves on to better work.

    But in terms of this comic, hopefully the story can get some focus and direction that has been sorely lacking for a long time, and it can continue and conclude on a higher note.

  • Tiago

    I get that the main Star Wars title is just a vehicle to give all the original characters some background, but this episodic style is boring as hell, the only reason I keep reading these series, is because sometimes you get a cool short story that makes the ride worthwhile, like the single issue starring Artoo and Threepio, which was my favorite until now, hilarious.

    I'm also digging this new Stormtrooper. One of the reasons I loved the Clone Wars was the military side of the story, I loved those

    I get that the main Star Wars title is just a vehicle to give all the original characters some background, but this episodic style is boring as hell, the only reason I keep reading these series, is because sometimes you get a cool short story that makes the ride worthwhile, like the single issue starring Artoo and Threepio, which was my favorite until now, hilarious.

    I'm also digging this new Stormtrooper. One of the reasons I loved the Clone Wars was the military side of the story, I loved those squads to pieces, and I'm glad we're finally getting more focus on the troops, both on the comics and the movies, lets see where this goes, something tells me this new Stormtrooper is a veteran from the Clone Wars, and I would freaking love that.

    I didn't hate the rest of the book, its just too episodic.

  • Chad

    Jason Aaron finishes up his Star Wars run by breaking up the characters into little two people solo issue adventures. The best of the bunch is the Sana and Lando issue that shows just how formidable Sana is. Salvador Larroca's art in the book has grown uglier and uglier over the last couple of volumes. His tracing of faces of photos from the movies looks odd and doesn't fit with the rest of his art in each panel. The coloring of the faces looks like a badly retouched black and white photo that h

    Jason Aaron finishes up his Star Wars run by breaking up the characters into little two people solo issue adventures. The best of the bunch is the Sana and Lando issue that shows just how formidable Sana is. Salvador Larroca's art in the book has grown uglier and uglier over the last couple of volumes. His tracing of faces of photos from the movies looks odd and doesn't fit with the rest of his art in each panel. The coloring of the faces looks like a badly retouched black and white photo that has been colorized. This volume was a bit of a thrown away to be honest.

  • Dan

    some parts were really good and others just okay. Hate how the art is not consistent.

  • Gianfranco Mancini

    Almost a 4 stars mixed bag of stories about well-matched pairs of characters, my most favourite ones were the Han/Chewie, the droids and the group Scar stormtroopers one.

    Now I like much more Sana, but her team up with Lando make seem all other characters like poor idiots.

    And the movie frames with iconic characters faces were just too many and weird this time... just look at Han Solo.

    Larroca??? WTF??? Oh good grief...

  • Travis Duke

    First to note: these are a bunch of individual stories. Secondly they are O.K. at best.

    The Luke and Leia story is pretty weak.

    The Sana and Lando story is one of the better ones.

    The Chewy and Han story is also one of the better ones.

    The droid story is O.K. but not good.

    The SCAR squadron story is not good at all.

    Tusken Raider story is just bad.

    The annual issue number 3 I skipped I was done.

    The art is pretty creepy I gotta say Larroca is getting odd. The facial photo realism is so creepy and just

    First to note: these are a bunch of individual stories. Secondly they are O.K. at best.

    The Luke and Leia story is pretty weak.

    The Sana and Lando story is one of the better ones.

    The Chewy and Han story is also one of the better ones.

    The droid story is O.K. but not good.

    The SCAR squadron story is not good at all.

    Tusken Raider story is just bad.

    The annual issue number 3 I skipped I was done.

    The art is pretty creepy I gotta say Larroca is getting odd. The facial photo realism is so creepy and just doesn't pair with the cartoon backgrounds. it is a total mismatch.

    If you have to read it, just read the Sana story and the Han story and be glad you did.

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