Called to Create: A Biblical Invitation to Create, Innovate, and Risk

Called to Create: A Biblical Invitation to Create, Innovate, and Risk

We were created by an infinitely creative God to reflect his love and character to the world. One way we do that is by continuing his creative work. In this energizing book, serial entrepreneur and bestselling author Jordan Raynor helps artists, entrepreneurs, writers, and other creatives reimagine our work as service to God and others, addressing such penetrating question...

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Title:Called to Create: A Biblical Invitation to Create, Innovate, and Risk
Author:Jordan Raynor
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Called to Create: A Biblical Invitation to Create, Innovate, and Risk Reviews

  • Jodi

    I loved this book! I never looked at God’s creation of the Universe and us as him being an entrepreneur. I’m guilty of creating my business The Resume Studio as a means to make a living but never as something he put into my heart to serve Him and do his work. This book not only opened my eyes more to creation and serving God, but also for finishing my book. This book has helped me gain more clarity in what I need to do. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has had the strong sense that the

    I loved this book! I never looked at God’s creation of the Universe and us as him being an entrepreneur. I’m guilty of creating my business The Resume Studio as a means to make a living but never as something he put into my heart to serve Him and do his work. This book not only opened my eyes more to creation and serving God, but also for finishing my book. This book has helped me gain more clarity in what I need to do. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has had the strong sense that they need to create.

  • Patti Meyerdirk

    This book has changed my perspective about the eternal value of all the things I create, such as in my scrapbooking, baking, writing, and other things throughout the day. I highly recommend this book to all entrepreneurs, creatives, and all those in full time ministry. He begins with "God was the first entrepreneur. Jordan discusses how we learn that He was creative before we learn that He is loving and merciful. A solid biblical foundation is laid throughout the book, along with over 40 stories

    This book has changed my perspective about the eternal value of all the things I create, such as in my scrapbooking, baking, writing, and other things throughout the day. I highly recommend this book to all entrepreneurs, creatives, and all those in full time ministry. He begins with "God was the first entrepreneur. Jordan discusses how we learn that He was creative before we learn that He is loving and merciful. A solid biblical foundation is laid throughout the book, along with over 40 stories of entrepreneurs and creatives. The last chapter ends with eternity and the value that our creativity will carry into our heavenly work. Inspiring.

  • Sarah

    I'm not super into non-fiction. I'll read it and enjoy it, but it's not often that a non-fiction book grabs me and interests me like this one did. It was incredible!

    As someone working towards being a professional photographer and attempting to start a baseball program, there were all kinds of helpful insights and encouragement. I really like the real-life stories; a lot of pretty amazing people out there.

    Growing up in the Lutheran church*, the idea of vocation is not a new concept. And yet, it

    I'm not super into non-fiction. I'll read it and enjoy it, but it's not often that a non-fiction book grabs me and interests me like this one did. It was incredible!

    As someone working towards being a professional photographer and attempting to start a baseball program, there were all kinds of helpful insights and encouragement. I really like the real-life stories; a lot of pretty amazing people out there.

    Growing up in the Lutheran church*, the idea of vocation is not a new concept. And yet, it's so easy to forget and think that the "big players" for the kingdom are the missionaries, pastors, and those in some kind of full-time ministry. Raynor hammers home the point that EVERY. SINGLE. PERSON is a missionary, called to do their work for the glory of God. It's such a simple idea, summed up well in Colossians 3:23, but we still forget.

    Called to Create will remind you of principles and values you already hold, give you new insights, and make you think about old things in a new way.

    If you are a creative or wanting to get into a venture that is creative or just know some creatives and want to maybe understand and help them a little more, READ THIS BOOK!!!!

    *maybe other denominations talk about this too, but it's a big thing in the Lutheran church.

  • Lori Sutton

    This book was so good. It was motivating, uplifting, and knowledgeable. It was also nice that it was a book for Christian entrepreneurs.

  • Emilie Hendryx

    Are you called to create?

    In this stunning, and possibly ground-breaking, book by Jordan Raynor, we find that there is such a thing as being "Called to Create".

    I've been a creative person from the start. Growing up in a home where my father is an artists and musician and my mother is a quilter and a musician, I was never far from art supplies, music, a camera (disposable or otherwise), and the encouragement to create. My family nurtured my creativity. That is not always the case with some.

    As we f

    Are you called to create?

    In this stunning, and possibly ground-breaking, book by Jordan Raynor, we find that there is such a thing as being "Called to Create".

    I've been a creative person from the start. Growing up in a home where my father is an artists and musician and my mother is a quilter and a musician, I was never far from art supplies, music, a camera (disposable or otherwise), and the encouragement to create. My family nurtured my creativity. That is not always the case with some.

    As we face in the "real world", the stress of choosing a career based on what you can be paid and what jobs are available is a big deterrent to creativity. It can be hard to say we want to "follow our creative dreams" when becoming a doctor seems so much more helpful. Or perhaps its the thought that starting up an Etsy shop doesn't seem as "holy" as becoming a missionary. For those of us who do break the mold and become entrepreneurs, we may find ourselves wondering if we can possibly serve God and our creative passions at the same time.

    These things, and more, are all addressed in Jordan's fantastic book Called to Create. As a creative, I felt welcomed into this book from the very beginning. I thought - he's talking to me! - when he mentioned Etsy shop owners, writers, and photographers, but he uses such a wide variety of stories from all walks of life and different areas of creativity that any creative will feel at home among these pages.

    I could go on and on about the things I liked in this book, but I'll leave it at saying that, if you are entrepreneurial and creative, you need to read this book. You need to be reminded that your talents are God-given and that He can do amazing and complex things with them. That you don't have to be a pastor or a missionary to serve Him fully. You also need to be reminded that everything we have is just that--a gift bestowed for use on a grand scale.

    I highly recommend this to all creatives (writers, photographers, shop owners, calligraphers, business creatives, bakers, designers, stay-at-home moms who want to use their creative talents, and so many others!). You'll be refreshed, energized, encouraged and, if you're like me, ready to take on the next big project one creative effort at a time.

    _______________

    I received this book for free but was under no obligation to post a review. I do so under my own motivation and the opinions I have expressed in this review are honest and entirely my own.

  • Kori

    For Christian artists who have been told their creation isn’t valuable enough, not religious enough, not evangelical enough, or has no eternal significance....this book is for you. And it will change the way you think about your work.

  • Elizabeth Johnson

    We are all creative in some manner. We all create processes, routines, or methods for our jobs (whether paid or unpaid). We all must figure out how to best juggle various roles and responsibilities, without failing miserably in any of them. We all must effectively adapt prior-learned skills and academic knowledge to our current situations. In doing so, we reflect our Maker — the very first creative being. He was the One who established order out of chaos to make something new for the good of oth

    We are all creative in some manner. We all create processes, routines, or methods for our jobs (whether paid or unpaid). We all must figure out how to best juggle various roles and responsibilities, without failing miserably in any of them. We all must effectively adapt prior-learned skills and academic knowledge to our current situations. In doing so, we reflect our Maker — the very first creative being. He was the One who established order out of chaos to make something new for the good of others. This book gives some interesting food for thought on the idea of God as the First Entrepreneur, identifying the ways that role was reflected through each member of the Trinity (a unique but biblically-based perspective!), and connecting that to His invitation to us to continue creating in this world: “God created us to be co-creators with him, to do ‘the things that God has done in creation — bringing order out of chaos’ to create new things for the good of others.”

    The crux of the matter is that everyone is called to create, or be creative, for the purpose of glorifying God, loving others, and making disciples. We cannot separate creativity from those things. And in order to accomplish them, we must find the place where our skill and ability intersect with the need of others. Raynor says: “In order to best glorify our Creator and love others, Christians should do the work we are best at, work that God has equipped us to do exceptionally well . . . If we choose work we can’t do well, that’s a poor reflection on God, whose character we are called to image to the world.”

    This doctrine of creativity is developed throughout the rest of the book by focusing on four key elements.

    — Calling: considering God as the First Entrepreneur, the theology of work, and embracing our call to create.

    — Creating: understanding how the fact of our “Caller” changes the why, what, and how of our creating.

    — Challenges: balancing hard work and trust, handling disappointment and failure, and renewing our minds.

    — Charge: fulfilling the Great Commission through our unique calling, stewarding profit wisely, and creating for eternity’s sake.

    Raynor cites examples and shares wisdom from over forty different Christian entrepreneurs — from the founders of Chick-fil-A and In-N-Out Burger, to content creators such as Lewis, Tolkien, and Bach. He shares personal examples too, since he is (what he calls) a serial entrepreneur. He’s learned some of these lessons the hard way, and wants us to benefit from his mistakes.

    Called to Create is not a dry examination of theory or a trifling record of stories: it is a biblically-based, richly-developed, practically-applied look at how and why every Christian is called to be creative. It is one of the best books I’ve read on the topic of creativity, partly because it’s one of the few written from a worldview firmly rooted in the inerrancy and authority of Scripture. I would highly recommend to anyone considering the purpose of vocation, the motivations for work, the reasons for pursuing various occupations, or how to create with eternity always in view.

  • Alexis

    As a creator and aspiring entrepreneur who gets to work a day job supporting other creators, I was so excited to get my hands on Jordan Raynor's book Called to Create, out this month from Baker Publishing.

    Raynor presents the biblical case for creators, innovators, and risk takers to fulfill their callings not just in service, but in the marketplace.

    I have been blessed to be part of creative Christian community that has fostered many of the concepts Raynor discusses as I've developed as a writer

    As a creator and aspiring entrepreneur who gets to work a day job supporting other creators, I was so excited to get my hands on Jordan Raynor's book Called to Create, out this month from Baker Publishing.

    Raynor presents the biblical case for creators, innovators, and risk takers to fulfill their callings not just in service, but in the marketplace.

    I have been blessed to be part of creative Christian community that has fostered many of the concepts Raynor discusses as I've developed as a writer and content creator. Many  are not as fortunate because, frankly, the evangelical church is not always the most encouraging a creative pursuits. The misconception that to serve God, you must be in full time ministry is tossed out Raynor's front door on it's ear before his introduction really gets rolling. What replaces it is the beautiful truth that God is a creator and therefore, we are also called to create.

    Raynor writes in a simple and to-the-point fashion that can easily encourage and equip those for whom the discussion of creativity and innovation are not as encouraged, especially from a Christian perspective.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the interviews and input from the likes of classic writers as well as successful business people and entrepreneurs. C.S. Lewis and Chick-Fil-A in the same book is always a win.

    The book is broken up into four parts: calling, creating, challenges, and charge. Each unpacks a discussion about the philosophy and reality of the creative life. He addresses the need for risk-takers and innovators from the church. The book is a call to rally, renew, and flourish as artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, and world-changers. I was encouraged and empowered by Raynor's book and I am so thankful.

    I would recommend Called to Create for those who don't yet have or are looking to foster a creative Christian community. I also think Raynor speaks firmly but encouragingly to the struggling innovator.

    Filled with inspiration, experience, and evidence, Called to Create will have you ready to dig your hands into your next project.

  • Sarah

    Have you ever read a book where you thought, Man this person is smarter than I am? That is exactly what I think of when I talk to people about "Called to Create." This book doesn't make you feel intimated, but rather it brings you on journey of a Biblical perspective of what it means to cultivate a Biblical foundation of creating and being an innovator in the business world. I love the idea that entrepreneur is anyone who takes risk to create something new for the good of others. We can all clas

    Have you ever read a book where you thought, Man this person is smarter than I am? That is exactly what I think of when I talk to people about "Called to Create." This book doesn't make you feel intimated, but rather it brings you on journey of a Biblical perspective of what it means to cultivate a Biblical foundation of creating and being an innovator in the business world. I love the idea that entrepreneur is anyone who takes risk to create something new for the good of others. We can all classify ourselves as entrepreneurs when we look at the definition this way. Whether you're making a new recipe for the first time or creating a document to share at work, you're doing it for the betterment of others. I love this!

    I also enjoyed the idea of creating and businesses being about furthering the Kingdom of God! I love that this book was about being Kingdom minded, which is so important and lacking in the business world today. This book is a mix of creating and business all in one. I highly recommend it! The principals and foundation it lays is outstanding. It is a great book for being a Christian, and creative entreprenuner! You will love this book. I give it 4.5/ 5 stars. A favorable review was not required.

  • Joan

    This book is not quite what I anticipated, based on the title. I thought the book would deal with being creative in general. Raynor, however, has focused this book on only one aspect of being creative, being an entrepreneur.

    I was surprised at Raynor beginning his book by saying God was the first entrepreneur. That just did not ring right with me. Raynor later gave this definition: “an entrepreneur is anyone who takes a risk to create something new for the good of others.” (Loc 130/2958) The risk

    This book is not quite what I anticipated, based on the title. I thought the book would deal with being creative in general. Raynor, however, has focused this book on only one aspect of being creative, being an entrepreneur.

    I was surprised at Raynor beginning his book by saying God was the first entrepreneur. That just did not ring right with me. Raynor later gave this definition: “an entrepreneur is anyone who takes a risk to create something new for the good of others.” (Loc 130/2958) The risk could be financial or social so his definition is a much broader one than I would make. I do have an issue with calling God an entrepreneur, however. In general understanding, an entrepreneur is one who organizes and operates a business, that is, provides goods or services to people. Describing God as one who operates a business just does not ring true to me. Also, Raynor says such an operation must include risk. God is omniscient, knowing the future, so there was no risk involved in His creating. He knew precisely what was going to happen.

    That criticism aside, I really appreciate this book. The Christian community has too often distinguished the “secular” work of owning a business from the “spiritual” work of full time ministry. Raynor sets the record straight, defending the traditional Reformed view that all life is spiritual, including non-ministry vocations. He writes about calling, motives, products, challenges to Christian entrepreneurs, making disciples, and more.

    Raynor is an accomplished entrepreneur. He uses his own life as an example but also includes stories of many others. They are great illustrations of entrepreneurs doing their work to the glory of God and with excellence.

    I do recommend this book to Christians who are interested in business. You'll find great examples of people doing much good for others. You'll see how entrepreneurs further the glory of God through both behavior and products. There is a link to a free journal you can download to work through your own thoughts as you read the book.

    Food for thought: What will you choose to create for the glory of God and the good of others?

    I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

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