Someone to Love

Someone to Love

Constantly in the spotlight thanks to her politician father's rising star, Olivia Blakely feels the pressure to be perfect. As the youngest girl in her class, she tries hard to keep up and to seem mature to the older boy she's crushing on, even as she catches his eye. But the need to look good on camera and at school soon grows into an all-consuming struggle with bulimia....

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Title:Someone to Love
Author:Melissa de la Cruz
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Someone to Love Reviews

  • Alaina Meserole

    I absolutely love Melissa de la Cruz and her writing. So when I saw this book was new this year (and month) AND it was available at my library.. well you don't have to tell me twice. I clicked the "reserve" button way too quickly.

    's cover is freaking beautiful that I just wanted to kiss the book when I picked it up. I didn't actually do that because I probably would've freaked out the librarians who were watching me..

    Now this book is about Olivia, aka Liv, who is the daughter of

    I absolutely love Melissa de la Cruz and her writing. So when I saw this book was new this year (and month) AND it was available at my library.. well you don't have to tell me twice. I clicked the "reserve" button way too quickly.

    's cover is freaking beautiful that I just wanted to kiss the book when I picked it up. I didn't actually do that because I probably would've freaked out the librarians who were watching me..

    Now this book is about Olivia, aka Liv, who is the daughter of a Politician. However, she is not only that but she is just a teenager dealing with bulimia. Liv is dealing with a very common problem because most teens are dealing with bulimia, anorexia, etc. I like that she was dealing with something so realistic that teens who are/aren't dealing with the same situation can still relate to her. It doesn't have to be them going through what she is - no, it could be someone they know or just go to school with.

    Overall, I really liked Liv. I think it probably has to deal with the fact that when I was younger someone said something to me about my weight and I sort of stopped eating for two weeks. Once my sister found out she told my dad and I was sort of put on watch - where they would sit me down for every meal and watch me eat everything on my plate. Looking back it wasn't the smartest idea to just stop eating but it was like I had blinders on. After a day or two, I didn't even realize I wasn't eating anything. Of course now that never happens - I love food way too much to just stop eating.

    I completely related to Liv throughout the entire book and I was so happy that I finally got to read it. I loved everything about it and I'm kind of sad that it's over. I can't wait to read the next book written by Melissa.

  • Sarah

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.

    I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along.

    The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm,

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.

    I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along.

    The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm, and she struggled with her relationships with her family, friends, and love interest. I did think that the author did a good job of representing someone with an eating disorder, but I also found it quite difficult to get into the story.

    The ending to this was okay, and I was pleased that Liv was finally getting some help.

    ★★★★★★☆☆☆☆

    6 out of 10

  • Erin

    Trigger Warning for scenes involving self-harm, underage drinking, and the topic of eating disorders, specifically bulimia.

    My previous experience with Melissa De la Cruz was reading "The Witches of East End" and this book is certainly not dealing in magic. Rather, Cruz's character, Liv is a high school student with a talent for art, but a very low self esteem. Her parents are distracted by her father's political race for

    Trigger Warning for scenes involving self-harm, underage drinking, and the topic of eating disorders, specifically bulimia.

    My previous experience with Melissa De la Cruz was reading "The Witches of East End" and this book is certainly not dealing in magic. Rather, Cruz's character, Liv is a high school student with a talent for art, but a very low self esteem. Her parents are distracted by her father's political race for governor and her older brothers have their own adult worries. Neither they nor her best friends, Sam and Antonia notice Liv's descent into an eating disorder. Determined to make it with the "in crowd" and snag one of the hot teen actors that attends her school, Liv will do anything to finally be pretty.

    I noticed at the end of her book, Cruz dedicates the story to those who she knows that have suffered from this disorder. Although as a reader, it was sometimes hard to connect with Liv and in the beginning of the story, I just felt she was so very shallow. But then I came to understand that because of her self perception, Liv truly was unable to stop herself from continuing to purge her body. On the other hand, I felt the end was rather rushed to resolution and while there were glimmers of emotion from Liv's family members, I find it hard to believe that a young woman would only spend a few days in hospital after battling bulimia for almost two years. Mind you, I do love the last sentence of the story about how Liv needs to love herself before dating again .

  • Kate (beautifulbookland)

    First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.

    Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just

    . I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really eas

    First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.

    Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just

    . I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really easily. So reading this book? Not my greatest idea.

    I just want to start off by saying that I think Melissa de la Cruz meant well. I think she tried her hardest to write a book about eating disorders (which are incredibly difficult to write about, by the way. Even I struggle to explain what it's like living with it on a daily basis), but it just...I don't think it worked, and I think I've come to the conclusion that books like this that detail the lives of eating disorder sufferers are dangerous in the wrong hands.

    I don't want to talk about me and my experiences a load (this is a book review, not a Kate review), but I just want to explain where I'm coming from. When I was at my worst, at the beginning of my hospital admission, I would do

    to get rid of a few calories. I hid food in every single place possible and constantly had food crumbs in my bra. I was always looking for new ways to lose weight, whether that be from the pro-ana websites, or from books like Wintergirls, which is possibly the most dangerous and triggering ED book ever written. So the detail in which Melissa goes into when describing how Olivia purges...it's not good. And it's something that vulnerable, anorexia-consumed Kate would have

    up.

    The above comment is also relevant to recent films like To The Bone. It's dangerous. Yes, awareness needs to be spread. But I think the better way to spread awareness is in the form of memoirs or autobiographies, from people who know what it's like and can offer wisdom and encouragement for coming through the other side; people whose job is to inform, and not just entertain people for a few hours in the form of a YA book.

    Another thing I didn't like about Someone to Love was how Olivia's bulimia was brushed off by nearly everyone. Nobody seemed to take it seriously. Olivia's mother knew that she had an eating disorder, but what did she do? Nothing. She let her daughter spiral out of control, not even

    to her daughter about it. When Olivia's dad finds out about her ED, he asks her mother if she knew what was going on and she said:

    "Yes, it's very common among teenage girls."

    ...

    ...

    I'm going to shout it so the people at the back can hear; EATING DISORDERS ARE NOT TEENAGE GIRL PHASES. They do not discriminate, they are SERIOUS, and should NOT be ignored and allowed to sort themselves out. They are fucking terrifying, and isolating, and they aren't taken seriously enough.

    There's one other thing that I want to bring to attention: when Olivia is getting help at the end of the book, her doctor confides to Olivia she herself used to cut herself. And you know what she said?She said that she was a much "more violent cutter" than Olivia.

    You what?

    HOW

    FUCKING

    TRIGGERING

    WOULD

    THAT

    BE

    ?!?!

    That is basically saying that Olivia's problem isn't as serious as hers was. Self harm can easily be turned into a competition, and you can also easily convince yourself that you don't have a self harm problem by telling yourself that others do it more severely than you. I know. Believe me.

    Deep breath, Kate. Deep breath.

    So, the writing? The characters? Yeah, they were decent. Olivia irritated me a lot in the end, but I could also relate to her a lot when she was comparing herself to other girls. That is something that was realistic; Olivia's fascination with other girls, and her struggle to not dislike them because they were skinnier than her. That is something that ED patients struggle with a lot; when I was first admitted to the ED ward, I was in a wheelchair, and nobody spoke to me because I was the skinniest person there. And that's not me or my illness blowing my own trumpet, that's literally what I was told by the other patients, and the nurses. Don't get me wrong, those girls are lovely and I still speak with them. But eating disorders are nasty, manipulative things.

    The other characters (minus Sam) really irritated me at one point or another, but not enough that I need to start another essay about them.

    I'm going to wrap this review up because it's ridiculously long, but I needed to vent. I appreciate Melissa taking on a really difficult subject, but there were a lot of things that just didn't ring true for me. I obviously don't speak for everyone; there will probably be some ED recovered patients who like this book. I personally, though, didn't.

    *I received an e-arc via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

  • ✨ k a t

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