Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life

Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life

New York Times bestselling author Jen Hatmaker, with playful hilarity, shameless honesty, and refreshing insight, assures readers they have all the pluck they need for vibrant, courageous, grace-filled lives.Jen Hatmaker believes backbone is the birthright of every woman. Women have been demonstrating resiliency and resolve since forever. They have incredibly strong shou...

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Title:Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life
Author:Jen Hatmaker
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Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life Reviews

  • April  L

    Of Mess and Moxie has given me permission. Permission to be exactly who I am, permission to create, permission to fight for what I believe in and to build the kind of rich, wild, moxie-filled community that exudes love, grace and acceptance. "This wild and glorious life" is so full of joy and with these permissions, we can live it freely!

    As a 30 year old single woman, books like Of Mess and Moxie can make me nervous. I don't need the reminder that I'm single, or childless when I so desire those

    Of Mess and Moxie has given me permission. Permission to be exactly who I am, permission to create, permission to fight for what I believe in and to build the kind of rich, wild, moxie-filled community that exudes love, grace and acceptance. "This wild and glorious life" is so full of joy and with these permissions, we can live it freely!

    As a 30 year old single woman, books like Of Mess and Moxie can make me nervous. I don't need the reminder that I'm single, or childless when I so desire those things. Jen doesn't do that. I feel valued and loved for who I am - - even important and necessary. I get to learn about the journeys of wives and mothers in a way that doesn't bring envy or loss, but understanding and empathy. Oh and as a teacher, no one has ever made me feel more valued and understood. Jen Hatmaker is a cheerleader for every kind of woman and, as my grandma would say, it just tickles me silly to be a part of her tribe!

  • Anna LeBaron

    Jen Hatmaker does it AGAIN! If you read and loved her previous book, For The Love, then this book is for you!

    I laughed so hard at the hilarious parts...and then cried real tears as she reached down into the tender places that needed her words. Jen tells the truth and then wraps it up with a sassy bow. Of Mess And Moxie is another gift to the world.

    I received an advance reader copy from the publisher.

  • Hannah

    Somewhere along the way I got the idea that Jen Hatmaker was mainstream and orthodox. I had seen her books around and had the idea that she wasn’t really anything radical...just another nice women’s teacher. But then last year I heard of her response to the Nashville Statement and I have to say I was absolutely floored.

    So then this book came out and hit the bestseller lists and was very present in the bookstore. I love the cover and I loved the premise, so I cracked the cover to see what she is

    Somewhere along the way I got the idea that Jen Hatmaker was mainstream and orthodox. I had seen her books around and had the idea that she wasn’t really anything radical...just another nice women’s teacher. But then last year I heard of her response to the Nashville Statement and I have to say I was absolutely floored.

    So then this book came out and hit the bestseller lists and was very present in the bookstore. I love the cover and I loved the premise, so I cracked the cover to see what she is like. Right away, she was outgoing, personality plus, and very sure of her own opinion. So far so good. Witty. But then little things popped up, then bigger things. Hang on and I’ll mention the reasons I left the book at the bookstore. I read the beginning section and then various other sections through the book to see if it got any better.

    -She is actually quite snobby. While preaching about love she refers to people who don’t agree with her in terms like “The pointy-finger old church lady” and describes how she and her pals made fun of her. She speaks from an area of affluence and talks about all the little things that get on her nerves...really, in the end, I know she has struggled with the idea of affluence before because she wrote 7, but her complaints are mainly very very first-world complaints. It sets a tone that, although humorous, is irksome to someone like me who is working three jobs to make ends meet as a single woman. And I feel like she’d laugh at me and find a name to call me if she heard me disagree with her opinion.

    -Drinking. This one was a big one for me. I don’t think it’s wrong to drink as long as it isn’t to the point of drunkenness, but alcoholism is a huge problem in society, and for a spiritual leader to have it so present can lead others into thinking it’s okay to drink all the time until it’s too late and they are addicted. Seriously, every chapter had mention of wine or drinks or something of the sort. If a recovering alcoholic got their hands on this book I’d hate to see the consequences, because it’s portrayed as a normal and enjoyable and expected part of relaxation and friendship.

    -“White lies.” I didn’t see her use the term, but throughout the book are multiple instances of her using deception and/or manipulation to gain the end she wants. It seems harmless to do one’s child’s schoolwork for them when they run out of time, right? Seems necessary to grab a hammer and pretend to be ready to fix something around the house in order to get one’s husband off the couch and ready to fix something? But it’s clear from her humorous commentary that she does these things for the purpose of getting the job done by someone other than herself (then why pretend to do it?) and so that her kid can get a passing grade (it’s not the kid that just passed the grade, it’s you who did. Woo hoo, graduated adult....) By having us laugh at cute/funny/whimsical bits like this, it cheapens the effects of truth and deception and makes deceptive behavior acceptable. Yes, the famous lists are laughable and relatable. But to say that she actually does some of those things lends a stamp of approval to that type of behavior. Other people will hush the voice of conscience because Jen does it too and they laughed over it with Jen.

    -Cussing. Taking the Lord’s name in vain and using forceful vulgarities.

    -Put-down of Jesus. “Hey, pray straight to God when you have marriage troubles. Jesus wouldn’t get it because he wasn’t married.” UHHHHHH. 1) Jesus understands everything 2) When was God married?

    So that was where I put it aside. Evidently not for me.

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