Bitch Planet, Vol. 2: President Bitch

Bitch Planet, Vol. 2: President Bitch

Eisner Award-nominated writer KELLY SUE DeCONNICK (PRETTY DEADLY, Captain Marvel) and VALENTINE DE LANDRO (X-Factor) follow up on the success of EXTRAORDINARY MACHINE with the second installment of their highly acclaimed and fiercely unapologetic BITCH PLANET. A few years down the road in the wrong direction, a woman's failure to comply with her patriarchal overlords resul...

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Title:Bitch Planet, Vol. 2: President Bitch
Author:Kelly Sue DeConnick
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Bitch Planet, Vol. 2: President Bitch Reviews

  • Tori (InToriLex)

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    I was overjoyed to pick up with the characters in this series. This volume explained more about how Bitch Planet came to be, although there are still pieces to that puzzle missing. We catch up with the characters on Bitch Planet who are still trying to find ways to use their participation in the upcoming Megaton games as a form of rebellion. However in this issue we learn more about the horrors of male power being revered and unchecked at the costs of yo

    Find this and other Reviews at

    I was overjoyed to pick up with the characters in this series. This volume explained more about how Bitch Planet came to be, although there are still pieces to that puzzle missing. We catch up with the characters on Bitch Planet who are still trying to find ways to use their participation in the upcoming Megaton games as a form of rebellion. However in this issue we learn more about the horrors of male power being revered and unchecked at the costs of young girls. There are a slew of new characters being introduced but not a lot of character development to accompany them. Despite that this was was an enjoyable volume because we finally see the seeds of revolution spreading.

    This is one of my favorite ongoing comics right now because it deals with identity as being a trait of who you are, rather than something that defines your humanity. The pages of these comics touch on many different kinds of diversity. There is a important scene meant to shadow the murder of Tamir Rice that was included to highlight how deadly authority can be. The ads were included at the end of some volumes to highlight the many ways that woman conform and hide while sacrificing their happiness.

    We finally got to meet President Bitch who did not disappoint, demonstrating her commitment to the cause and unwavering courage. I'm excited to see how the rebellion will be rolled out in the next volume. This was a wonderful continuation of a not so unfamiliar future, and I can't wait to read more.

    (Bitch Planet #1-5)

  • Megan

    So, I read this graphic novel last week during my dinner break, and it's taken me this whole week to figure out how to organize my thoughts. Here we go.

    I read volume 1 of Bitch Planet last November, in the scrum of one of the worst elections in American history. I remember watching Donald Trump talk about abortion as if doctors "ripped the baby out, they rip it right out," reading about Mike Pence's beliefs on conversion therapy for LGBTQ+ folks, and listening to countless waves of white Republi

    So, I read this graphic novel last week during my dinner break, and it's taken me this whole week to figure out how to organize my thoughts. Here we go.

    I read volume 1 of Bitch Planet last November, in the scrum of one of the worst elections in American history. I remember watching Donald Trump talk about abortion as if doctors "ripped the baby out, they rip it right out," reading about Mike Pence's beliefs on conversion therapy for LGBTQ+ folks, and listening to countless waves of white Republican men yammer about the evils of Planned Parenthood and the evils of people seeking medical help (*cough* and hundreds of other services) there. Not very Christ-like, any of it.

    Between now and then, Trump was elected President, and everything feels pretty fucking awful.

    Since his "election" there has been a huge backlash against Trump- by women, by teachers, scientists, librarians, politicians, mothers, grandmothers, children. I remember the pride I felt being among hundreds of thousands of people for the Women's March in Boston. I remember being so proud of my best friend for working at the Museum of Science during the March for Science and leading a show about the largely ignored PoC and women in science throughout history. I also remember cringing at the hundreds of thousands of pink hats and transphobic signs held by protestors, thinking that we can do better than this. I remember feeling, and still feel deeply ashamed that our trans sisters (not just our cis-ters), who were monumental in Stonewall and face some of the biggest threats in society today, were left out of this march.

    Reading volume 2 now, not even a year later, is cathartic as all hell. If Volume 1 was the commentary we needed at the time surrounding the election on how to process what the hell was going on, Volume 2 is the fodder to keep us awake and angry, resisting and persisting. The diversity and inclusivity, and the detail in this series is incredible. So much has happened in the world since volume 1 was released, and DeConnick does an incredible job weaving together current events with fiction, although the line feels very blurred in real life. I'll sing Bitch Planet's praises forever, even if my favorite character dies. And that's saying a lot.

  • Sarah

    I enjoyed this even more than the first. There are some interesting new developments on Bitch Planet. We get to know a few of the characters back stories. Some twists in the story are revealed. The characters are great. You can’t help but to cheer them on.

    The artwork is wonderful and the full page ads return but this time they are advertising products for Non-Compliant women. I was really sad to realize there isn’t another book for me to check out and I hope the author continues with them.

    Conten

    I enjoyed this even more than the first. There are some interesting new developments on Bitch Planet. We get to know a few of the characters back stories. Some twists in the story are revealed. The characters are great. You can’t help but to cheer them on.

    The artwork is wonderful and the full page ads return but this time they are advertising products for Non-Compliant women. I was really sad to realize there isn’t another book for me to check out and I hope the author continues with them.

    Content Warnings:

  • Hannah

    I don't know how to review this. I always struggle with reviewing graphic novels - especially when it comes to the artwork (somehow "oh look how nice it all looks" really is not all that descriptive). But I also struggle with reviewing this in particular because I am not really sure on my thoughts at all. So, this will be a rambly kind of review where I try to sort my thoughts as I go.

    First of all, I did enjoy this. But it also made me umcomfortable. But I also love the characters. But I think i

    I don't know how to review this. I always struggle with reviewing graphic novels - especially when it comes to the artwork (somehow "oh look how nice it all looks" really is not all that descriptive). But I also struggle with reviewing this in particular because I am not really sure on my thoughts at all. So, this will be a rambly kind of review where I try to sort my thoughts as I go.

    First of all, I did enjoy this. But it also made me umcomfortable. But I also love the characters. But I think it is a bit on the nose maybe. But I love the underlying message of acceptance. But the optimist in me thinks it is a bit to pessimistic. But the pessimist in me thinks it is so plausible, scarily so.

    The characters are what sells this book to me: all the women here are brilliant, flawed, believable characters. I adore the way they are drawn (both figuratively and literally) and how unique they feel. However, they sometimes feel to be more of a vehicle to tell this particular feminist story than completely fleshed-out characters in their own right. I kept asking myself if they would exist if they weren't needed to make particular points; if their reactions would still stay the same; if they would be fundamentally the same people.

    The artwork is stunning in way that sometimes feels uncomfortable. The juxtaposition of colour works brilliantly but has at the same time an overwhelming effect. There were some stylistic choices that I found perfect: especially the use of lipstick in a way that subverts its traditional use.

    I think ultimately I enjoy the big ideas and the characters and many of the style-choices a lot more than I enjoy the story. The plot is definitely the weak point here but I am interested enough to keep holding on the the ride to see where it all goes in the end.

  • britt_brooke

    Arrived - and completed - today! The intensity, devotion, and emotion. It's just all so well done. And the artwork blows my damn mind! The "advertisements" are so creative, funny, and sadly, true.

  • Paul

    Much better than the first volume imo.

  • David Schaafsma

    Bitch Planet is a series set in the near future when women’s rights are long gone with the end of resources like Planned Parenthood and a woman’s right to choose. Women who do not fit into society's ideal image for women--physically, emotionally, and so on--get sent to Bitch Planet, and as they say on the cover, these women are "caged and [justifiably] enraged." Men take a hit in this one, of course, but women also take their fair share of abuse, for buying into and helping reinforce societal st

    Bitch Planet is a series set in the near future when women’s rights are long gone with the end of resources like Planned Parenthood and a woman’s right to choose. Women who do not fit into society's ideal image for women--physically, emotionally, and so on--get sent to Bitch Planet, and as they say on the cover, these women are "caged and [justifiably] enraged." Men take a hit in this one, of course, but women also take their fair share of abuse, for buying into and helping reinforce societal standards.

    Not much happened in the first volume except world-building, so we can see what happened on Earth to create what happens on Bitch Planet. We get to meet expected asshole creepy guys who send women away for being non-compliant with men's rules. And there aren’t any good guys, really. But it is a wild story, angry and darkly funny, about women of all shapes and sizes and colors and genders who do not fit in, do not comply, who resist. And then there is Meiko’s death, when things turn darker.

    In the second volume, President Bitch, DeConnick and DeLandro surprisingly go darker and more serious, opening with the backstory about Meiko, weaving in current events with a touch of Orange is the New Black meets Handmaid’s Tale non-compliance. And violence in response to violent and restrictive patriarchy, so it’s not as if everyone will agree that this is the way to go. But there’s a lot of energy, and all the characters are interesting and flawed, so it's not just an us-them tale.

  • Bradley

    There's a lot to love in this, not even scratching the surface of the deep, deep sarcasm and rage-filled need to break out of the whole cultural slavery of the thing.

    I mean, let's face it, the artwork isn't good UNLESS you're aware of the horribly patriarchal men's club nonsense of the whole '70's comic era and how this particular comic glorifies it even as it flips the whole thing on its head. And then there's the blatant nudity with real bodies instead of pinups. And let's not ignore the fact

    There's a lot to love in this, not even scratching the surface of the deep, deep sarcasm and rage-filled need to break out of the whole cultural slavery of the thing.

    I mean, let's face it, the artwork isn't good UNLESS you're aware of the horribly patriarchal men's club nonsense of the whole '70's comic era and how this particular comic glorifies it even as it flips the whole thing on its head. And then there's the blatant nudity with real bodies instead of pinups. And let's not ignore the fact that every woman here has a real story and real emotions and hardly any of them can be put safely in any box without invalidating everything they are.

    And that's why it's freaking fantastic to have them all imprisoned.

    And, of course, REVOLTING.

    Vol 2 can't be read on its own and I'm pretty sure no one is going to try. The stories flow naturally from the original and the real kicker is always going to be how close some families come to true happiness... and how awful and disgusting and injust the actions of anyone with just a tad bit more power differential are able to ruin everything. Not just brutal rapes, but the complete destruction of identity, hope, and sometimes, sanity.

    To say I feel for this comic is putting it mildly. I want to revolt along with everyone else here. Who gives a flying f*** if I'm some middle-aged white dude? Everyone deserves respect. I don't care who you are. If you're not wearing your subversive lipstick, then I'll get you some. :)

    This one's up for '18 Hugo for the best graphic novel. It's fantastic, but I've still got my heart set on another. That's NOT to say this isn't a globally kick-ass title that should ever be missed! It rocks. Hard. :)

  • Julie

    Better than the first volume: the plot is picking up steam and finally started rolling properly, and the arc with Eleanor Doane -- the eponymous President Bitch -- is so tantalising, and it makes me desperately want to learn what the hell happened in this world & to this society to bring them to this place, and what happened to her. I also loved loved

    Meiko's backstory, the depiction of her family trying to find a way to secretly raise strong, independent girls in this nightmarish soci

    Better than the first volume: the plot is picking up steam and finally started rolling properly, and the arc with Eleanor Doane -- the eponymous President Bitch -- is so tantalising, and it makes me desperately want to learn what the hell happened in this world & to this society to bring them to this place, and what happened to her. I also loved loved

    Meiko's backstory, the depiction of her family trying to find a way to secretly raise strong, independent girls in this nightmarish society. Her dad is the best.

    This volume is also more clear-cut in its tackling things like intersectional feminism, trans issues, complicity in oppression, and police shootings. The overarching story arc is also becoming clearer, with the uprising on Bitch Planet and as all the ingredients in the pot start to boil over.

    NOW WHERE IS VOLUME THREE

    Also, as always, the ads are the

    My favourite page in the whole book:

  • brea

    Ugh, here we are again...

    I didn't even review the first volume, because I didn't want to admit how disappointed I was in it.

    I want to LOVE this series; but I find, try as I might, I am just not a fan of Kelly Sue DeConnick's work.

    She seems like a dope ass lady to be friends with, but I just can't hang with her graphic novels. They always seem to just be lacking

    ...

    However, this is not a review of Kelly Sue as a person (again, she seems DOPE AF) but of a comic that I read, and somewha

    Ugh, here we are again...

    I didn't even review the first volume, because I didn't want to admit how disappointed I was in it.

    I want to LOVE this series; but I find, try as I might, I am just not a fan of Kelly Sue DeConnick's work.

    She seems like a dope ass lady to be friends with, but I just can't hang with her graphic novels. They always seem to just be lacking

    ...

    However, this is not a review of Kelly Sue as a person (again, she seems DOPE AF) but of a comic that I read, and somewhat enjoyed.

    I thought this volume was MUCH better than volume one. Although, 50% of the time I didn't have the slightest clue WTF was going on; but I will not deduct "star points" for that, because I should probably have reread the first volume before diving in again because its been a while.

    I did find this volume to be a little more structured than the first, and therefore a little easier to

    as a reader. I also REALLY liked the magazine clippings at the end of the volume. They were well written, and made readers uncomfortable as they point out all these really basic, really misogynistic things people do for the sake of "blending in" to society.

    With that said though, there were still a lot of things lacking, and I found myself looking forward to the end of each issue, so that I could *break* (wtf do I need a break for, I wasn't doing anything strenuous...).

    I really want to like this series. As a self proclaimed MEGA FEMINSIT BITCH, I want to be moved by the comic the way other bad ass ladies have been, but the truth is I'm not. I think there are some wonderful feminist elements to this story, and for that I applaud the SHIT out of Kelly Sue and De Landro, but the truth of the matter is, this is not fantastic writing or storytelling, and that is what this review is based on.

    If Bitch Plant has spoken to you as a bad ass feminist person, then that is awesome! I feel you, respect you, and support you. I just don't feel the same way, unfortunately.

    Rating: 2.75/5 stars. While this comic still hasn't quite wowed me, I will continue to support it, and give it a fair shot, because gosh darn it, this BITCH wants to love it!

    ** Thank you to Image comics for supplying me with a copy of Bitch Planet, Vol 2. in exchange for an honest review. **

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