Run Fast. Eat Slow.: Nourishing Recipes for Athletes

Run Fast. Eat Slow.: Nourishing Recipes for Athletes

From world-class marathoner and 4-time Olympian Shalane Flanagan and chef Elyse Kopecky comes a whole foods, flavor-forward cookbook that proves food can be indulgent and nourishing at the same time. Finally here's a cookbook for runners that shows fat is essential for flavor and performance and that counting calories, obsessing over protein, and restrictive dieting does m...

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Title:Run Fast. Eat Slow.: Nourishing Recipes for Athletes
Author:Shalane Flanagan
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Edition Language:English

Run Fast. Eat Slow.: Nourishing Recipes for Athletes Reviews

  • Yvette (hooked on the nook)

    Excellent new recipe book geared toward clean eating for athletes, especially runners. I love the addition of the herbal remedies for various ailments, such as inflammation, upset stomach, common cold, etc. I am a firm believer that organic cures are the best for the human body. I find I heal quicker. I made the whole chicken recipe in less than 90 minutes with the cauliflower for dinner and it was fantastic. I found that all the recipes are simple to make and can be made in advance and eaten as

    Excellent new recipe book geared toward clean eating for athletes, especially runners. I love the addition of the herbal remedies for various ailments, such as inflammation, upset stomach, common cold, etc. I am a firm believer that organic cures are the best for the human body. I find I heal quicker. I made the whole chicken recipe in less than 90 minutes with the cauliflower for dinner and it was fantastic. I found that all the recipes are simple to make and can be made in advance and eaten as left overs as I am super busy during the week and don't usually have time to cook. One other suggestion start with the fish tacos with mango salsa. We grilled Halibut on the barbecue and it was out of the world!!! Enjoying the food and I look forward improving my running as result.

  • Kara

    Ugh. Now I'm hungry.

  • Michelle

    I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway from Rodale Publishing.

    Because this was an advance copy, it didn't feature full-color photographs that will be in the final copy. For me, color photos are crucial, so the final product will benefit people like me - those who need vivid photos to entice the brain, eye and palate. I also need visuals to motivate me to cook.

    I really like the concept of this book - nourishing recipes for athletes. I'm not a foodie, but I want my food to be healthy, nourishing and t

    I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway from Rodale Publishing.

    Because this was an advance copy, it didn't feature full-color photographs that will be in the final copy. For me, color photos are crucial, so the final product will benefit people like me - those who need vivid photos to entice the brain, eye and palate. I also need visuals to motivate me to cook.

    I really like the concept of this book - nourishing recipes for athletes. I'm not a foodie, but I want my food to be healthy, nourishing and tasty.

    The book has 12 chapters: book concept, pantry basics, and then nine category chapters (drinks, breakfast, snacks and appetizers, salads, soups, mains, sides, sauces/dressings, treats), runners remedies (recipes in the book for specific issues, such as colds, etc.).

    If you live in a city with a Whole Foods, you can most likely find ingredients there, even if you live in small city. They do provide online sites where some of the items can be purchased.

    Some of the recipes are new to me, but some are variations of things I already do. I did like that the authors included a recipe for chicken bone broth and a mineral broth.

    This looks to be a really good cookbook for athletes who are willing to cook. The book does seem geared toward runners, and it's written by two runners. I don't know that the CrossFit or Paleo crowd will like it as much as the running crowd. Some of the recipes seem heavy on the carb side. This cookbook is part of the slow cooking trend.

    One of the books strengths is the Treat chapter. These are recipes that satisfy the sweet tooth using fruits, dark chocolate, oatmeal and more.

    The Sides Chapter was disappointing for me. I am always looking for healthy sides that are made from nonstarchy vegetables. The ones they include are variations of things I already do.

    Because I'm not someone who cooks a lot, I prefer cookbooks that tell me how long it will take to prep and how long it will take to cook. This cookbook does neither, and some of the recipes look time intensive to prep and cook.

    Overall, it's a nice cookbook. The recipes look like they would please most palates, so if someone is cooking for a family and only one is a runner or other athlete, the variety of recipes are sure to please most. Most recipes serve 2, 4, or 6. The recipes definitely do look nourishing and tasty.

  • Marathon County Public Library MCPL
  • Michelle

    Great tips and interesting recipes. Unfortunately I’m allergic to several key ingredients (soy, nuts, avocados) so I can only make a few recipes.

  • Becky Fuller

    Lovely cookbook with what appear to be excellent recipes. If I attempted to do these recipes myself in addition to caring for my two small children I would ironically no longer have any time to actually run. Definitely something to aspire to though!

  • Matilda

    a cool book for athletes focusing on the runner. while there are no chapters on how to run faster it's under the concept that if you fuel yourself correctly then the speed will come naturally (or with a lot of hard work in training)

    haven't tested any of the recipes yet but to do like how each recipe gives you what part of training it is suited for ie speedwork, recovery, long run etc

  • Jenny Michael-lust

    I am excited to try the recipes I this book to not only eat healthier, but to help the runners in my family.

  • Sarah Stead

    This book is difficult to rate. Although it's a cookbook, I did read the content from front to back. If I were to break down my rating, I'd say 4 stars for the recipes, 2 stars for additional content, and 1 star for the writing style.

    As a person on a restrictive diet due to health issues, and one who prefers homemade whole foods to packaged and processed ones, frequently making the same recipes gets old. The authors, who are both runners, have several unique ideas for combining nutritious ingre

    This book is difficult to rate. Although it's a cookbook, I did read the content from front to back. If I were to break down my rating, I'd say 4 stars for the recipes, 2 stars for additional content, and 1 star for the writing style.

    As a person on a restrictive diet due to health issues, and one who prefers homemade whole foods to packaged and processed ones, frequently making the same recipes gets old. The authors, who are both runners, have several unique ideas for combining nutritious ingredients with the intent to provide proper nourishment for athletes, however, anyone can enjoy them.

    In addition to the recipes, the book includes suggested items to have in your pantry, as well as information on remedies for common runner's ailments (linking back to specific recipes that could nutritionally support that condition).

    On the header of each page, the recipes note whether they are gluten-free, vegetarian, or vegan, which was helpful to be able to quickly note which ones best suited my needs. Unfortunately, I first noticed this distinction when I was reading the recipe for pita chips, which was marked as gluten-free, despite the "whole wheat pita bread" required in the ingredients list! The rest of the notations seemed accurate.

    Although the content is decent, reading through it was agonizing. The whole book sounds like an overly fake infomercial, replete with excessive adjectives and hip buzzwords. Here's an excerpt from the first recipe for a coconut-kale smoothie:

    I'd highly suggest skimming through the supplementary information and getting straight into the recipes! I haven't tried any yet, but from past experience working with these ingredients, I can tell that they will be full of flavor.

  • Jackie

    I didn't know anything about this book before getting it from the library, except that a friend recommended it to me. Based on the title, I expected it to be about half advice on running, half advice on food. It's all food. That's not really a criticism of the book, because I probably could have read the back of the book to find that out, but more of a heads-up for anyone else.

    I find it hard to give this book a high rating. It doesn't really outline a specific dietary plan or give you definite

    I didn't know anything about this book before getting it from the library, except that a friend recommended it to me. Based on the title, I expected it to be about half advice on running, half advice on food. It's all food. That's not really a criticism of the book, because I probably could have read the back of the book to find that out, but more of a heads-up for anyone else.

    I find it hard to give this book a high rating. It doesn't really outline a specific dietary plan or give you definite goals/rules to guide your food choices. Its advice and suggestions are very general. That's probably appropriate given that the authors are not licensed doctors or trained dietitians. One's an olympic marathon runner, and that's impressive, but it really only qualifies her to give advice about running. Reading about an average week of menus for her is interesting, but they don't really give you enough information to truly follow her example. A lot of the advice comes down to cook at home, don't eat pre-packaged food, and eat a balanced diet. That's not very specific, and it certainly isn't specific to runners.

    Ok, so this won't be laying out a new dietary plan, but most of the book is recipes, so how does it fare as a cookbook? Meh. I tried 5 recipes: a smoothie, some breakfast scones, some trail mix, a chicken and rice stew, and a sauteed pear dessert thing. The smoothie was gross; not drinkable. The scones and pears were both pretty average; enjoyable but not good enough that I'd bother making them again. The trail mix was predictably decent. The stew was actually quite good; I'll be making a copy of that one. I plan on trying out a few more of the entree recipes, but I feel pretty safe making a judgement now about the overall quality of the book.

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