Savor: Living Abundantly Where You Are, As You Are

Savor: Living Abundantly Where You Are, As You Are

Shauna's honest, beautiful storytelling style makes this devotional as comforting and inspiring as an hour around the table with the people we love.Combining content from Bread and Wine, Cold Tangerines, and Bittersweet, as well as new writing and recipes, this devotional from Shauna Niequist speaks spiritual truths to women in short passages that invite us to connect with...

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Title:Savor: Living Abundantly Where You Are, As You Are
Author:Shauna Niequist
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Savor: Living Abundantly Where You Are, As You Are Reviews

  • Kimberly Coyle

    I'd read her grocery list. And that's saying something since I hate to cook. This book is gorgeous, inside and out.

  • Dawn Michelle

    I was not as enamored with this book as I was with "My Utmost for His Highest". Not even remotely. This is much more geared towards married women with children. While I had several of the devotions that spoke to me, the book on a whole just didn't work for me. So many time I was reading one of them and was reminded of my own failed marriage and ended up in tears and I am pretty sure that was not the intended response.

    She IS a good writer though and I appreciated that aspect of the devotional.

  • Ginger

    No one writes more beautifully than Shauna Niequist.

    That being said, this was a book of her essays, chopped down into smaller bits for a "devotional." Most of this isn't new material, but her wonderful essays that appear elsewhere like Bread & Wine and Bittersweet.

    Read those instead.

    Firstly, because this is not really a devotional. At least not enough to suffice for a year spiritually on its own. It would be a wonderful inspirational passage to read in the afternoon as a pick-me up over tea

    No one writes more beautifully than Shauna Niequist.

    That being said, this was a book of her essays, chopped down into smaller bits for a "devotional." Most of this isn't new material, but her wonderful essays that appear elsewhere like Bread & Wine and Bittersweet.

    Read those instead.

    Firstly, because this is not really a devotional. At least not enough to suffice for a year spiritually on its own. It would be a wonderful inspirational passage to read in the afternoon as a pick-me up over tea or something, but it is milk, not meat. Delicious, sweet milk. Life-affirming and inspiring for sure. But I don't know God better after having read this. I know myself a little better. And that's ok. But a little beside the point if I'm DEVOTING myself to something. Niequist is a fan of labeling so very much "sacred" that it sort of loses its meaning (moments, crumbs, beauty, space, story, a sunset, chopping, a track star, friendship, tables). And in fact, a couple of times she dances into territory that is bordering on unbibilical. [By way of example, she states that in marriage we should "take responsibility for your own emotional and spiritual health." While there is an element of truth there, that we only depend on God for holiness, the tenor of her overall message runs contrary to the picture of marriage described in Ephesians 5, where it is clear that we are to love and sanctify and nourish the other. This, and other places, sound a bit more like pop psychology than the counter-cultural mysteries of God.]

    If you have time only to read a page or so a day for a devotional, go with something with more depth and focus on the character of God, like Oswald Chamber's My Utmost for His Highest, that focuses on and expounds the Word instead of assigning a verse loosely to a topic.

    If you're interested in the topics she explores of being grateful for the gifts God gives us, read some of these as well:

    John Piper - Desiring God

    Joe Rigney - The Things of Earth

    James K.A. Smith - Desiring the Kingdom

    Frederick Beuchner

    Robert Farrar Capon - Supper of the Lamb

  • Ashley Wells

    I was actually pretty disappointed in this book, as a devotional. It is just not enough for me, it's often not connected with the scripture, and it's so short and sometimes the point isn't clear. I do like the prompts, but even those are often not connected.

  • Laura

    I feel bad. I never do this, but I am abandoning this book. Instead of looking forward to my devotional "snack" for the day, I am becoming resentful and reading out of duty with a begrudging attitude.... not a good sign. First off, I really can't call this a devotional. I know what she is trying to do, but the material presented is not executed in any sort of way that convicts, nor encourages me in my walk with God. I love life applicable lessons, but this, for me, reads very choppy and often fe

    I feel bad. I never do this, but I am abandoning this book. Instead of looking forward to my devotional "snack" for the day, I am becoming resentful and reading out of duty with a begrudging attitude.... not a good sign. First off, I really can't call this a devotional. I know what she is trying to do, but the material presented is not executed in any sort of way that convicts, nor encourages me in my walk with God. I love life applicable lessons, but this, for me, reads very choppy and often feels forced. I am still going to try reading another book of hers that I own, though. Maybe this devotional just wasn't a good fit for me.

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