Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview

Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview

Winner of a 2004 ECPA Gold Medallion Award! Winner of an Award of Excellence in the 2003 Chicago Book Clinic!What is real?What is truth?What can we know?What should we believe?What should we do and why?Is there a God?Can we know him?Do Christian doctrines make sense?Can we believe in God in the face of evil?These are fundamental questions that any thinking person wants ans...

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Title:Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview
Author:J.P. Moreland
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Edition Language:English

Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview Reviews

  • Paul

    This is a great introduction to philosophy in general, the philosophy of religion and Christianity in particular. If the reader masters each section, s/he will have the equivalent (almost) of an undergraduate education in philosophy, and the philosophy of religion. Broad topics discussed are: Introduction to philosophy, Introduction to Logic (very brief and scattered), Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Ethics, Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. This is achieved in

    This is a great introduction to philosophy in general, the philosophy of religion and Christianity in particular. If the reader masters each section, s/he will have the equivalent (almost) of an undergraduate education in philosophy, and the philosophy of religion. Broad topics discussed are: Introduction to philosophy, Introduction to Logic (very brief and scattered), Epistemology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Ethics, Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. This is achieved in 626 pages.

    Even though I disagree with the authors (Moreland and Craig) in many areas (for example, freedom of the will, internalism and evidentialism with respect to justification - though they seem friendly towards externalism, Thomistic dualism (though I could be persuaded), as well as a few other areas), I can't say enough about the value this book holds for both the young Christian thinker, as well as the Christian in the pew. The Christian in the pew will be light years ahead of his co-workers if s/he reads this book. It will make you able to deal effectively with not only every day situations where critical thinking skills are important, but also objections to the faith.

    The Reformed Christian will want to supplement (or skip) some of the usual suspects (libertarianism about the will, for example) and look elsewhere. Helm, Frame, Sudduth, Welty, Anderson are helpful Reformed Christians. Guys like John Fischer are helpful for the free will debate, even though Fischer isn't a Christian. If you're presuppositionally inclined, you'll want to supplement this book with writings by Bahnsen, Frame, Van Til, Oliphint, etc. My advice would be to read the entire book, though. This will help you to become conversant with libertarianism, among other things. And, reading the traditional arguments for God will at least allow you to develop defeater-defeaters, or cummulative case arguments, for God. This is beneficial even if you're a hard-core presuppositionalist.

  • Clinton Wilcox

    An excellent introduction to philosophy written by two Christian intellectual heavyweights. They don't just review the positions they take, but they review other positions on a multitude of different topics and give them a fair treatment. It is probably not for everyone; those without an interest in philosophy probably won't find it very stimulating. But if you'd like to go deeper in your Christian faith, or if you're just looking for a general introduction to philosophy, this is a great book fo

    An excellent introduction to philosophy written by two Christian intellectual heavyweights. They don't just review the positions they take, but they review other positions on a multitude of different topics and give them a fair treatment. It is probably not for everyone; those without an interest in philosophy probably won't find it very stimulating. But if you'd like to go deeper in your Christian faith, or if you're just looking for a general introduction to philosophy, this is a great book for you.

  • J. Wallace

    Good book that discusses the philosophical biases and presuppositions that impact issues of faith and reason. I also discuss this topic in my book, “Cold Case Christianity” (Chapter 1: Don’t Be A “Know-It-All”)

  • Jonathan B

    A great and fairly comprehensive overview of all the major issues in philosophy and philosophy of religion from a Christian perspective. I don't agree with every stance the authors take and they tackle many issues from a specific Christian tradition (Arminianism), but this is still an invaluable resource.

  • Doutor Branco

    In this book J.P. Moreland and William Lane Craig deals with a comprehensive introduction to philosophy from a Christian perspective, seeking to introduce readers to the principal subdisciplines of philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, ethics and philosophy of religion. They act in characteristic clarity and incisiveness. The book reflects about the reality of man been made in the image of God, helping us to extend biblical teaching into areas not expressly addr

    In this book J.P. Moreland and William Lane Craig deals with a comprehensive introduction to philosophy from a Christian perspective, seeking to introduce readers to the principal subdisciplines of philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, ethics and philosophy of religion. They act in characteristic clarity and incisiveness. The book reflects about the reality of man been made in the image of God, helping us to extend biblical teaching into areas not expressly addressed in Scripture, facilitating the spiritual discipline of study, enhancing the boldness and self-image of the Christian community, and is requisite to the essential task of integrating faith and learning.

    The content of the book is solid and helpful to all that desires to comprehend the basic foundations of philosophy. It is a dense book with a great deal of information requires from us the task of going back and forward as much time as it is necessary to understand its many ideas.

    Due to my personal interest in the subject of postmodernism I got a good insight from the chapter six, THEORIES OF TRUTH AND POSTMODERNISM. The view presented of postmodernism as a loose coalition of diverse thinkers from several different academic disciplines made me realize about the great task ahead of me to improve my research in this subject. The main gain for me and my ministry in studying this material was tantamount to understand that the postmodernism is a rejection of truth, objective rationality and authorial meaning in texts. The question that raises in my mind is how can I impart truth to a generation that rejects it totally? That will be just my search for an answer.

  • John

    Together with the disciplines of biblical and theological studies, philosophical studies are widely recognized as an indispensable model for constructing a Christian worldview. There have been several influential works that have historically shaped the philosophical conversation, but few contemporary works have been more influential than Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview by J. P. Moreland and William Lane Craig. Now a newly revised and updated second edition of this book contin

    Together with the disciplines of biblical and theological studies, philosophical studies are widely recognized as an indispensable model for constructing a Christian worldview. There have been several influential works that have historically shaped the philosophical conversation, but few contemporary works have been more influential than Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview by J. P. Moreland and William Lane Craig. Now a newly revised and updated second edition of this book continues its legacy of widespread use and acclaimed reviews.

    Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview is divided into six major sections: (1) Introduction, (2) Epistemology, (3) Metaphysics, (4) Philosophy of Science, (5) Ethics, and (6) Philosophy of Religion and Philosophically of Theology. Each section contains a number of important and useful chapters for constructing a Christian worldview. Throughout the book, the reader will discover a number of charts and diagrams to help illustrate the philosophical concepts being discussed. Keywords are also bolded to help readers recognize their importance in context, and each chapter ends with a summary and a checklist of terms and concepts.

    Moreland and Craig close the volume with a “Suggestions for Further Reading” bibliography with specific sections for each chapter. While these have been updated and thoroughly revised, it would have been useful to see them at the end of the chapters rather than a separate chapter at the end of the volume. Additionally, what is interestingly missing from this volume, in my opinion, is the inclusion of chapter summary questions and a glossary of the terms and concepts used throughout the book. Still, the revisions and updates to this volume, while not overcoming these specific shortcomings, provide readers with substantial revision and added material and chapters—including a new chapter on the doctrine of the atonement and updated evidence related to the Kalam Cosmological argument and the Teleological argument for cosmic fine-tuning.

    I’ve said this before and I will say it again, I’m admittedly not one with a very deep interest in philosophy. I recognize its importance and enjoy its various discussions, but I tend to spend more time in the arena of biblical studies and other related disciplines than philosophy. That said, I found this second edition of Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview to be equally as accessible and clear in presentation throughout as the former edition, even complex areas of epistemology and metaphysics that are detailed in nature are accessible to interested thinkers. Still, it should also be noted that this is certainly a college-level (possibly even a graduate-level) philosophy textbook and it does anticipate the reader is at least vaguely familiar with its material.

    Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview (second edition) by J. P. Moreland and William Lane Craig is still a first-rate, one-stop reference work worth occupying the shelf space of any serious student of philosophy, theology, or apologetics. Moreland and Craig do a superb job guiding the reader through the subject matter. It’s not a resource that everyone will enjoy. But, for those who will, Moreland and Craig have provided a treasure-trove of philosophical riches that will effectively establish a foundation for the Christian worldview. It comes highly recommended even for owners of the first edition!

  • Jacob Aitken

    Time and a second reading, along with various shifts in worldview, can fundamentally alter one's perception of an author. My first experience with Moreland and Craig, Moreland in particular, was *Love your God with all Your Mind.* Despite the title's fluffy, evangelicalish devotional appeal, LYGWALM actually was very rigorous and probably did more for getting my intellectual life started than anything else.

    I decided to read everything by Moreland (and Craig). Since *Philosophical Foundations of

    Time and a second reading, along with various shifts in worldview, can fundamentally alter one's perception of an author. My first experience with Moreland and Craig, Moreland in particular, was *Love your God with all Your Mind.* Despite the title's fluffy, evangelicalish devotional appeal, LYGWALM actually was very rigorous and probably did more for getting my intellectual life started than anything else.

    I decided to read everything by Moreland (and Craig). Since *Philosophical Foundations of a Christian Worldview* had just come out in 2003, I felt it would be a good text to read.

    When I got it though, I experienced several let-downs. It was waay over my head. And the parts I did understand I had to reject: Molinism and the classical arguments for the existence of God. I began studying ethics and Moreland/Craig's section on ethics, emphasizing the roles of normative, situational, and personal ethics, was outstanding.

    The Book's Value:

    They show the philosophical difficulties with all of Western philosophy (and theology).

    The Book's Highpoints:

    1. Excellent, if somewhat intellectually painful, chapter on how to do logic. Be warned, this is very, very hard to read.

    2. Gives a good discussion on whether knowledge is really "justified, true belief."

    3. Introduces the reader to the categories of time, substance, and space.

    4. Very good internal critique of Scient(ISM)'s presuppositions. Completely defangs modern science.

    5. Excellent discussion on the nature of ethical reasoning.

    6. Good critique of the Western doctrine of Absolute Divine Simplicity.

    Cons of the Book:

    1. This book is simply too hard and inaccessible for most people.

    2. I admit--I now see that their proofs for the existence of God are logically compatible. I reject the presuppositional critique of the Five ways. However, who has actually been convinced by this reasoning?

    3. The chapter on Molinism is very interesting However, I am not sure Molinism isn't itself another variant of Augustinian determinism.

    Conclusion:

    As a reference resource, this book is outstanding. However, to fully understand what they are saying, one needs to read upper-level philosophy and theology for about a year (I had to study for three or four years) to really understand what they are saying.

  • Frank Peters

    This was a textbook, and therefore not designed for light reading. As described, it is an introductory textbook to Philosophy, from a Christian perspective. The introductory chapters were excellent, and the section on logic was even enjoyable. Section 2, on Epistemology was also an excellent introduction. I found large portions of Section 3, on Metaphysics, to be dull or incomprehensible. But, it is very possible that this was entirely my fault. Section 4, Philosophy of Science was mostly excell

    This was a textbook, and therefore not designed for light reading. As described, it is an introductory textbook to Philosophy, from a Christian perspective. The introductory chapters were excellent, and the section on logic was even enjoyable. Section 2, on Epistemology was also an excellent introduction. I found large portions of Section 3, on Metaphysics, to be dull or incomprehensible. But, it is very possible that this was entirely my fault. Section 4, Philosophy of Science was mostly excellent. As a Physicist, this was the only section that intersected with my expertise. I am impressed with the amount of reading and research the authors clearly did in order to put this section together. Unfortunately, this section did have some clear difficulties (I would be inclined to say errors), that any Physicist would balk at. As an expert in optics, I found the suggestion that “redness” was a property that was fundamental, and existent outside of the universe (like and even number, for example) to be rather shocking. On the other hand, the arguments relating to how we can trust our scientific investigations in light of either theism or atheistic naturalism were excellent. The section (5) on Ethics was also very good. The authors brutally applied logic towards the problems encountered when those who believe in relativism encounter evil. I hope to put those arguments into good use at some point. The final section (7) on Philosophy of religion was actually a letdown. Some subsections were excellent; others were dreary, while others were simply disappointing. For example the last section on Christian Particularism has so many interesting aspects associated with it. These were introduced and then almost completely glossed over. It seems as if the authors were suddenly afraid of antagonising a particular denomination (or special interest group) and losing book sales as a result. Thus their comments remained mostly ambiguous. The editing of the text was below what would be expected with spelling and grammatical errors, and even possibly some words missing. But, all told, the book was well worth reading, and I will almost certainly return to various sections again.

  • Christopher

    When one thinks about philosophy and religion in America, one tends to think of an intellectual war not too dissimilar to that between science and religion, if there even is such a thing. However, one development in academia in recent years has been the philosophical resurrection of theism as a plausible intellectual alternative. Authors William Lane Craig and J.P. Moreland have been at the forefront of this movement and this textbook represents their synthesis of Western philosophical thinking

    When one thinks about philosophy and religion in America, one tends to think of an intellectual war not too dissimilar to that between science and religion, if there even is such a thing. However, one development in academia in recent years has been the philosophical resurrection of theism as a plausible intellectual alternative. Authors William Lane Craig and J.P. Moreland have been at the forefront of this movement and this textbook represents their synthesis of Western philosophical thinking and Christian theism. And when I say textbook, I mean it. This is not a very accessible book to the casual reader. In fact, the casual reader would be better off tackling Mr. Craig's

    or

    . This book is targeted for philosophy students at a university level, and Christian philosophy students in particular. The uninitiated will have a difficult time slogging through this book like I did with chapter 2's rules of logic and argumentation being a particularly early and high hurdle to leap over. Better to take the authors at their word and use this book more as a reference rather than as a book to be read cover to cover. That is not to say that none of this is interesting or insightful. Parts IV and VI, which deal with the philosophy of science and the philosophy of religion and philosophical theology, are particularly interesting. In some ways this is not a great textbook either. Although it has chapter summaries and lists of key words used in each chapter, there are no chapter questions to answer to aid in comprehension, nor are the key words defined at the end of the chapter, although they are bolded throughout the text, so finding their definitions shouldn't be too hard. The final word though is to try your hand at an easier book if you are not already familiar with philosophical concepts and if you are familiar to use this book as a reference book rather than a book to read casually.

  • Jamey

    This is a bit like reading Paradise Lost -- but with none of the pleasure -- in that you're watching the contortions of a Christian as he struggles to deceive himself and his naive readers,

    A special aspect of the disingenuous hokum in this book and others in its little posse -- the recent Christian "worldview" books, for instance

    by Norman Geisler, or

    This is a bit like reading Paradise Lost -- but with none of the pleasure -- in that you're watching the contortions of a Christian as he struggles to deceive himself and his naive readers,

    A special aspect of the disingenuous hokum in this book and others in its little posse -- the recent Christian "worldview" books, for instance

    by Norman Geisler, or

    by James Sire -- is this: they figured out that you piss people off and look dumb if you stick with the claim that your religion is uniquely true, but they remain committed to the premise that, well, their religion is uniquely true. So they creep up to the edge of the terrifying abyss of relativism (which is actually the edge of intellectual maturity) and then stop short because they're just

    to respect other worldviews. Just as "intelligent design" is a sneaky extension of creationism, this worldview-Christianity uses the language of pluralism to smuggle-in its own beshitted security blanket.

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