Cinder

Cinder

Sixteen-year-old Cinder is considered a technological mistake by most of society and a burden by her stepmother. Being cyborg does have its benefits, though: Cinder's brain interference has given her an uncanny ability to fix things (robots, hovers, her own malfunctioning parts), making her the best mechanic in New Beijing. This reputation brings Prince Kai himself to her...

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Title:Cinder
Author:Marissa Meyer
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Cinder Reviews

  • Steph Sinclair

    Why?

    WHY DIDN'T I READ THIS BOOK SOONER?!

    It was so AWESOME!

    MY EMOTIONS!!

    Let me go ahead and get this out of the way. I loved this book. Why in the world did I procrastinate with reading it? I've had

    sitting on my Kindle for a few months now and I continued to put it off over and over again. What a HUGE mistake! I even had the nerve to go into my local bookstore twice, pick

    up, and put it right back down. But all that doesn't really matter now because I've remedied the problem and

    Why?

    WHY DIDN'T I READ THIS BOOK SOONER?!

    It was so AWESOME!

    MY EMOTIONS!!

    Let me go ahead and get this out of the way. I loved this book. Why in the world did I procrastinate with reading it? I've had

    sitting on my Kindle for a few months now and I continued to put it off over and over again. What a HUGE mistake! I even had the nerve to go into my local bookstore twice, pick

    up, and put it right back down. But all that doesn't really matter now because I've remedied the problem and absolutely fallen in love with this wonderful story.

    When I first heard of

    before it's release, it was gaining quite a bit of buzz known for the retelling of

    . Marissa Meyer, my hat's off to you because a cyborg Cinderella in New Beijing, China? Badass. But then shortly before I read it, another blogger informed me that not only is it a

    retelling, but also had

    elements. OMG... someone had answered my prayers!  I don't think you can understand my excitement for that.

    Sailor Moon was my all-time favorite TV show and manga as a child. Reading

    reminded me of a simpler time before responsibilities, when the biggest thing I had to worry about was setting up the VCR (yes, a throwback!) every day because at 4pm, right before

    ,

    would come on. If I were to miss one episode, I would cry my little eyes out because I just had to know what happened next to Serena! I have seen every episode including the fifth season that didn't air in America. I've even seen the live action series in all Japanese. And for those that watch subtitled Japanese shows, you know that there comes a time in your marathon watching where you stop reading the subtitles and start thinking Japanese in your sleep. Yes, I am super fangirling and not ashamed one bit! So I think it goes without saying that the reasons for me loving Cinder so much, aside from being blasted by a rainbow of awesome with its creative premise, is that it has a lot to do with sentimental memories. I tell you this so you can understand one big thing:

    I wasn't sure about Cinder at first. As soon as the book started I noticed on every obvious downfall: Predictability. Seriously, the plot twist ran up to me and sucker punched me in the face at only 10% in. This concerned me, but it quickly became a non-issue as I continued to read. Why? Because the story was interesting. It was engaging. It was just plain old

    ! And I haven't had this much fun reading a book in a while.

    The plot was brilliantly done. Cinder is a mechanic, under appreciated by her mother and one of her step-sisters. The other step-sister adores her. As a cyborg she doesn't have the same rights as a normal person and her step-mother goes out of her way to remind Cinder this whenever she can. One day Prince Kai (*swoon*) requests her services to fix his android. And in true fairy tale fashion he begins to fall for her not knowing she is a cyborg. But this isn't just a love story. Oh no! The world has been suffering from a deadly disease that kills in a matter of days and it starts to become painfully obvious that Earth's only hope for a cure depends on an alliance with the evil Lunar Queen. And as you may have guessed it, she has plans for Earth. Dun, dun, duuuunnnnnn!

    I loved all the characters in

    , especially the heroine. Cinder was independent, feisty, and relatable. She didn't always make the right decision, but this is a heroine that learns from her mistakes. And

    Prince Kai? I loved him.

    The romance was so sweet. At first Cinder is wary of the Prince's advances because she is cyborg and doesn't want him to find out, but she can't help but develop feelings for him along the way. Basically what I'm saying here is that there's no insta-love. And you know how much I hate insta-love!

    Oh, and that ending! Marissa Meyer, how could you do that to my little heart? I need to know what happens now! You took two of my favorite stories and twisted them into this big ball of badass awesomeness and now I'm expected to wait until next year for book two?! And just look at the character line-up for the next books in the series:

    ,

    and

    . Little Red Riding Hood, Rapunzel and Snow White?!  I am so

    . Just so we are clear, I'm not above stalking.

    An ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. Thank you!

    More reviews at

    .

  • Jesse (JesseTheReader)

    wow. wow. WOW.

    I went into this book not expecting to like it. I'm not sure why, but this book completely surprised me!

  • Tatiana

    As seen on

    Let me first give credit where credit is due. A cyborg

    ? Wow! It's a bold premise. I applaud

    for thinking this up.

    In this re-envisioning of the fairy tale, Lihn Cinder is a cyborg, meaning, she is almost half mechanical - she has prosthetic hands and a foot, a big chunk of her internal organs are wired into her body. Cinder is a mechanic in New Beijing, the capital of the Eastern Commonwealth, a country ravaged by plague outbreaks. One day, the

    As seen on

    Let me first give credit where credit is due. A cyborg

    ? Wow! It's a bold premise. I applaud

    for thinking this up.

    In this re-envisioning of the fairy tale, Lihn Cinder is a cyborg, meaning, she is almost half mechanical - she has prosthetic hands and a foot, a big chunk of her internal organs are wired into her body. Cinder is a mechanic in New Beijing, the capital of the Eastern Commonwealth, a country ravaged by plague outbreaks. One day, the heir to the throne of the Commonwealth, Prince Kai, steps into Cinder's shop to get his android fixed, and everything changes for Cinder. She falls in love, she becomes a center of multiple intrigues, she discovers her own well hidden (even from her) secrets.

    As much as I appreciate an author willing to think outside the box, I am afraid in this case

    bit off more than she could chew. The world of

    is very imaginative and full of potential. New Beijing, royalty, plague, cyborg falling in love, a war with the Lunar (Moon) Empire. I mean, just think about the possibilities here. Too bad, these possibilities are never explored to their best advantage.

    Let's take Cinder, for example. She is almost half robot, there is stuff wired into her brain and body. Is she a human? Does she have artificial intelligence? Does she think of herself as human? How can she love? Are her emotions real or programmed? None of this is explained with any kind of depth. I compare this book to

    , and

    fails miserably.

    How about the setting? New Beijing! Futuristic China! Is there any Chinese flavor in this story? Any infusion of Eastern cultures, customs? Not really.

    Ok, maybe there is something to this Lunar business then? Who or what are these Lunar people? How did they get there? How do they live on the Moon? Why exactly are they at war with Earth? I still have no clue.

    My general impression after finishing

    is that every good idea in this story is developed very superficially. It's like

    is...

    's ugly cousin. What

    managed to do in his fairly short book with great depth - the world ruined by environmental changes, genetically altered human beings, poverty - is all done here, but in the most shallow way, as if the author was determined to keep the plot moving at a break-neck pace, afraid that any paragraph spent on layering the world or characters' personalities would bore readers.

    There is still some entertainments value in

    , and I did get all the way through it to find out how the story would unfold. (BTW, you can predict the novel's outcome at about page 50 and it all ends with a cliffhanger.) But the novel fails miserably at being thought-provoking, challenging or truly engaging, even though the ideas are all there. Squandered potential.

  • Emily May

    In this, my third attempt to read

    , I finally made it to the end. But I find myself wishing I hadn't bothered. Going into this book, I thought it was fair to expect a light, probably unremarkable, but ultimately

    read. I did not come to this book wanting my mind to be blown with science or to be taken to another world by beautiful prose, but I also did not expect it to b

    In this, my third attempt to read

    , I finally made it to the end. But I find myself wishing I hadn't bothered. Going into this book, I thought it was fair to expect a light, probably unremarkable, but ultimately

    read. I did not come to this book wanting my mind to be blown with science or to be taken to another world by beautiful prose, but I also did not expect it to be so painfully boring. Which it was.

    takes a bold and fascinating premise, sketches out a basic outline of it, and then never fleshes it out with any substance.

    A part-cyborg protagonist, a loose Cinderella retelling in a future/alternate universe, a setting in New Beijing, and a potential war with a kingdom of Lunar people (a race who live on the moon). This sounds like a recipe for a fantastic science-fiction novel, and yet we get very little info beyond what I've provided here.

    Who are these Lunar people? What about their history? How did they come to be on the moon? How disappointing it was that we never found out ANYTHING about them beyond the fact that they have an evil ruler - Queen Levana.

    And this setting in a future/alternate world. In New Beijing, even! Do we ever get an exciting look into its culture? Any beautiful or ugly visuals? Any insight into its history, customs... anything? Nope.

    And even if I forgive that, if I say that maybe all that goodness is being saved for later series installments, I simply cannot forgive the

    . Cinder and Prince Kai are empty, self-sacrificing heroes with little-to-no hopes, fears, desires and thoughts of their own. Adri is the classic evil stepmother. Iko was the not-so-funny sidekick.

    I'm also not sure I understand why part-cyborg people are considered second class citizens when they're basically regular humans who've had parts added to save them. But let's imagine I suspend that disbelief for a second - why did Meyer waste this perfect opportunity for Cinder to consider what it means to be human? For example, how much of a person can be replaced before they stop being a person and start being a machine? Are there really any differences between humans and machines beyond the materials they're made from?

    Though really, I could have forgiven many things if only the plot had been compelling, the conflicts engaging, and the characters vaguely interesting. I honestly had to force myself through.

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  • Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies

    I guess I'm on a year-end quest to be the last person to read popular series. Last week: Hunger Games. This week: Cinder.

    Or not. I hated it. No binging this series, sorry, dear friends. You may think it's harsh that I give this book one star when there was nothing offensive about it, but

    .

    Before reading the book, I knew why it came highly recommended to me; in theory, this book should have been awesome. An Asian protagonist (

    I guess I'm on a year-end quest to be the last person to read popular series. Last week: Hunger Games. This week: Cinder.

    Or not. I hated it. No binging this series, sorry, dear friends. You may think it's harsh that I give this book one star when there was nothing offensive about it, but

    .

    Before reading the book, I knew why it came highly recommended to me; in theory, this book should have been awesome. An Asian protagonist (

    ), an alternate universe, plenty of opportunities to spin a beautifully-woven (Asian!!!!) setting! A fairy tale retelling (Khanh loves retold shit!!!!).

    Yet for years, I resisted the many, many "KHANH, YOU GOTTA READ CINDER" because of one reason.

    . I don't like cyborgs, I don't like androids. Not the Google-based operating system, the concept of

    . No, thank you. I like my main characters purely organic and carbon-based.

    Let's get one thing straight. I have nothing against technology, it's just the concept of a human meshed with a robot that bothers me. I don't think such a being can have the same

    . Here is where the book could have changed my mind; Cinder could have been made to be more than a inhuman robot (what she is, in my mind).

    What's ironic to me is that

    I know she is part machine, but it never felt like that part of her was explored as much as her humanity is sold to us.

    Furthermore, the KHANH LOVES ASIAN SHIT part of me was so not sold on this. Yes, it's cute that the MC is Asian. Yes, it's cool that the new world is New Beijing.

    You know how you go to one of those super chic Asian fusion restaurants and you order a fusion dish that costs $100 on a beautiful plate, and the only thing that's "Asian" about it is the one drop of lemongrass essence that they add to the sauce? This book is like that.

    There is no explanation about New Beijing's culture. There is no explanation as to why it became that way.

    Sorry, guys, this series is not for me.

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